The less-deserving pro-independence website

Wings Over Scotland


Survey

An ongoing poll into the demographics and views of our readers. You can answer as many or as few questions as you feel like. The poll will occasionally be updated with new questions (usually flagged up on the site’s front page).

All answers are anonymous – we have no way of knowing an individual user’s votes.

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ABOUT YOU

 

Are you male or female?

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What's your age group?

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Where were you BORN?

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Where do you CURRENTLY live?

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Who (tick up to two boxes) did you vote for in the last HOLYROOD election? (NB parties listed are those with MSPs.)

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Who did you vote for at the last WESTMINSTER election?

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Which party would you be MOST likely to vote for in an INDEPENDENT Scotland's first general election?

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Which of these options is your actual constitutional preference, REGARDLESS of which options will be available on the referendum ballot paper?

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PRINCIPLES

 

For currency, an independent Scotland should:

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On the monarchy, an independent Scotland should:

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Are you in favour of equal marriage?

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Should an independent Scotland return railways to public ownership?

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Which of these is closest to your view on prisoners being able to vote?

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Should there be a minimum unit price for alcohol?

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Should Scotland continue to use nuclear power?

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Which is closest to your view on the Offensive Behaviour (Football) Act?

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Which of these is closest to your view on faith schools?

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SPENDING

 

What should Scotland do about higher education funding?

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What should be Scotland's approach to local taxation?

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What should be an independent Scotland's approach to general taxation?

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On defence, an independent Scotland should:

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In health, an independent Scotland should: (tick up to 5 boxes)

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FOREIGNERS

 

Regarding Europe, an independent Scotland should:

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An independent Scotland's relationship with NATO should be:

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In terms of foreign aid, an independent Scotland should:

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Which of these options is closest to your view on what an independent Scotland's immigration policy should be?

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    87 to “Survey”

    1. Ken Johnston says:

      Why only some questions available. Have I come too late to the party.

    2. Dan Huil says:

      Re first question. Not enough female readers of this website.Or is it higher in percentage terms here than on other political websites?

    3. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      “Or is it higher in percentage terms here than on other political websites?”

      Yes, basically.

    4. handclapping says:

      With Scotland coming bottom of the table for the proportion of the rich I can’t see that taxing just the rich will produce the taxes necessary. Its a nice thought that someone else will pay but unrealistic.

    5. Sapheneia says:

      Wonder if worth showing SSP as separate election voting option?  Would probably reduce “Other” to low number.

    6. Gav says:

      Nice set of choices – I look forward to someday being able to vote on those for real.  1st step in 2014.

    7. Taranaich says:

      Re first question. Not enough female readers of this website.Or is it higher in percentage terms here than on other political websites?

       
      While it’s good to see more women than you usually see on political sites, considering they make up half the population, it would be even better to see more.

    8. The voting questions are missing a ‘didn’t/couldn’t vote’ option.

    9. Sapheneia says:

      I guess in relation to taxation a definition of “wealthy” is key.
      I tend to look at it from the opposite end of the spectrum.  For example no one earning below, say, £15K should pay tax.  “Wealthy” would start above that in sliding scales, starting at 10% up to max of 50%.  I think it better that someone on lower pay does not suffer tax.  As I mentioned once before no upper rate tax relief on private pension contributions.
      The current system of tax deduction and then making a person claim a “tax credit” is a way to demoralise the lower paid.

    10. Wee_Monsieur says:

      A decent number of respondents though. Even though mostly SNP supporters, it’s a useful  survey

    11. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      “The voting questions are missing a ‘didn’t/couldn’t vote’ option.”

      That comes under “other”, or just not bothering to answer that question.

    12. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      “While it’s good to see more women than you usually see on political sites, considering they make up half the population, it would be even better to see more.”

      Sure. What do you suggest we do, go round and point guns at them?

    13. The Man in the Jar says:

      Rev. Stuart Campbell says:
      14 June, 2013 at 10:32 pm

      “While it’s good to see more women than you usually see on political sites, considering they make up half the population, it would be even better to see more.”

      Sure. What do you suggest we do, go round and point guns at them?

      Perhaps some fluffy kittens or some nice little pink flowers here and there!

      “Ill get my body armour and steel helmet on the way out!”

    14. TheTaxiDriver says:

      “While it’s good to see more women than you usually see on political sites, considering they make up half the population, it would be even better to see more.”
       
      Im all for seeing more. I get to see some sights in my Taxi I can tell you. Only tonight this lassie who was wearing a pair of these new fangled footless tights, insisted on showing me how weak the seam was a she had burst her crotch dancing, she had to go home to change! Well I never did.
      Some lassies get the look totally wrong and go for the old style tights that just look like shit, as if they forgot to dress, they leave nothing to the imagination what ever, you can see the pimples on their arse.
      Talking of which can Johan Lamont get any worse? Her last FMQs was just cringe inducing sneering and lies, scripted schoolboy sniggering. Even the funky gibbons behind her looked embarrassed.

    15. CW says:

      There was a whole raft of questions in the middle that I couldn’t vote on. And to be honest, I was gutted to see how many people agreed with UK immigration policy. It’s not appropriate to Scotland at all.

    16. Titler says:

      Interesting that, as someone only vaguely on the edge of the debate, and not entirely sympathetic to the wider cause, my answers where I felt informed enough to give them were more or less in line with the majority of posters here… except on the Republican referendum and Nuclear Power questions, in that I believe in both as soon as possible. The Nuclear power question only because I think you’re not going to stop people using more energy in the short term, so it comes down to damage calculations, and I think non-Nuclear has the worst outcome in the medium-but-getting-close-to-short and longer terms. If  cleaner technology can provide enough power in safer ways (and I have my doubts it ever can, because we’ll just ask for more) I’d then phase the nuclear plants out again, but anything which keeps the standard of living just that bit higher is a good thing, as people don’t tend to act rationally when they get into Weimar levels of collapse…
      Voted Labour in the last Westminster elections though, that was the one I was really off the WoSc charts on; but our candidate locally was Old Labour and there was no way the Greens were going to get in here.
      Didn’t vote on the Constitutional question because I’m still not convinced the debate is being held on the right issues. For all the information overload presented here, WoS is more focused on just how terrible everyone else is, or so it seems to me at any rate. That I didn’t need convincing of, it’s largely self evident on both sides of the border. But the recent corporation tax rate argument is one I was watching with a raised eyebrow for instance; a passionate defence was made of the pragmatic idea that 15% is better than nothing… but unless you close all the loopholes, you won’t be getting 15%, you’ll still be getting exactly nothing, just as you do now; Why would business pay more when it can engage in creative accountancy and pay less? What the businesses pressing for that figure are doing is not making a genuine offer to stay and honestly pay if tax is that low, but manipulating the debate so 15% becomes the figure seen as a reasonable amount of corporate tax. But if the Government can close all the loopholes and enforce payment, why would you ignore the democratic mandate which expects corporations to pay more, why not collect what you’d been elected to collect… unless by doing so you were seen as being unreasonable to Business and thus likely to lose votes? There’s the real fight, maintaining a genuine plurality of politics, not really Independence as such, in the face of all the sneaky Overton Window pushing schemes, in an age of corporate owned clickbait media and political whores.
      Now I believe you’ll see a greater improvement in Scotland, in the short term once English Toryism is removed (and England a probable increase in Tory dominance): On the basis of my votes here, the SNP would actually be much closer to the politics I personally would like to see. But the real question in my mind is, can you keep that sort of SNP, and thus, that sort of political independence in Scotland?  And how are you going to afford it, when the the acceptable level of taxation on multi-billion pound corporations is assumed to only be 15% now, as compared to say the 1950s when the NHS et all were first built, and top levels of tax were (and had to be and didn’t cause economic decay from being) in the 90%s?
      But again… in the short term, a lot more people are going to be hurt a lot worse by a Tory Government than an independent Scots alternative. So if I were North of the border I’d not perhaps put so much weight on future trends and want to take action now to minimize that actual suffering. In the meantime though, what the above survey illustrated to me was that if I actually had a positive case for Independence I would more likely be much more sympathetic because I am in agreement on most issues likely to benefit from it now; but, as a southern sort-of-soft-unionist-for-unrealistic-reasons, it’s much easier to be cynical than supportive and rationalize feeling cautious and suspicious. I know RevStu believes you’d have to be blind to not see the positives, but life is exhausting and a bit of reinforcement and refreshment for the knackered can only help… it really would be helpful to see more “Punching Back On Behalf Of The People” kind of stories.

    17. Hetty says:

      Can’t work out quite why so few women are not reading and/or commenting…
      I suggest many are too busy, keeping up with work, supporting their family members, being parents and often carers, and on top of that, keeping the home in a reasonably acceptable state, then hopefully relaxing with a glass of wine, and I hope NOT watching rubbish on tv, but they probaby are…or are women just not so interested in politics?
      It would be great to see more comments from women here. Women I know are less likely to discuss the referendum than men perhaps and they can be quite conservative really, and they all think I am a bit radical as I talk about politics and Scottish Independence, but I don’t understand them, really all I am asking is for a fairer bloody share of the spoils for ordinary people. 
       

    18. drygrangebull says:

      My wife reads this site as well, so we both took the quiz together. Hope everyone has a good weekend

    19. scaredy cat. says:

      Would be nice to know the spread of nationalities too.

    20. scaredy cat. says:

      @Hetty
      I think you are right. Women are just too busy ( I posted something similar in a previous thread). Juggling work, home and family leaves little time for yourself. Most are turned off by the media coverage and will want to find out more. Nearer the time, many more women will take an interest in this, I’m sure.

    21. Birnie says:

      It would be good to also have a question on nationalising the energy sector. Plus an extra option for a referendum on the EU similar to the options you gave on the monarchy

    22. Martin H says:

      The results for the first few questions suggests that the site is preaching to the converted. This is a pity as the other questions would get people thinking about the type of Scotland they want.

    23. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      Have grouped the questions into categories and added a question on where people were born, as well as where they live. Nationalising railways is sort of intended to stand for the entire principle of nationalisation – would anyone want to nationalise the railways but not the energy companies? And as for the EU, the poll basically IS a referendum. Vote however you’d vote if there was a referendum on the subject.

    24. Derick Tulloch says:

      Disappointing to see so few from non SNP supporters.  But the readership is huge so I suspect those of us SNP leaning are more active and motivated to contribute rather than just consume.  More female authored articles please!

    25. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      “More female authored articles please!”

      Not being female, there isn’t a lot I can do about that. I can only publish what I get sent…

    26. KraftyKris says:

      Hey Rev, I’m not sure about the advantages/disadvantages of local income tax local vs national income tax, do you have an article discussing this?

      I find it worrying that the most popular option for prisoner voting is that they don’t get the vote. It is part of the European convention on human rights that prisoners get the vote. If we are trying to rehabilitate prisoners and get them back into society then giving them their right to vote and choose who they want to be governed by is a step in the right direction.

      Not giving prisoners the right to vote is also obviously open to manipulation, I wouldn’t imagine that our government would arrest followers of other parties before an election but the possibility would be there. It is not right for government to decide who does and who does not take part in democracy. Equally you can’t let the electorate decide who gets to vote as it is also open to manipulation. The only logical option left is for all members of society, including those in prison, to get the vote.

    27. Clydebuilt says:

      a way to get more female authored articles and hopefully more female readers would be to invite contribututions from females!  simples
       
      what about women for Independence etc!
       
      maybe can use facebook to get the word out to The Ladies

    28. reginald says:

      Tobin Tax anyone ?

    29. marc says:

      I just want to say….looking over the votes cast you all might as well vote NO for independance cause summit the same or no change dont buy it for me????? salmond wants an extra 40,000 imigrants in this country per year…..where they gonna live when average waiting times for housing is 16months and what jobs do they get….when we have 293,000 on the dole who have no chance of a job because yomash or hendrik or marcel get first preferance. its nice to be nice and charitable and all that…..BUT independance is about or should be about putting scots first and making life better and just for all of us….if theres any pudding left then thats what we have to give…..
       

    30. Ken Johnston says:

      Re the first post, I asked if I had come late to the party, because only some voting buttons were visible. This in Firefox.
      Had the idea to switch to MS Explorer, which I Never use, it’s a backup.
      Lo and behold. All buttons visible and active. And before you ask, I’m fully up to date in FF.    21.00
      Wot’s going on, Rev.

    31. KraftyKris says:

      Ken, I’m using firefox and it worked fine.
       
      @marc You seem to have misplaced your question marks. You also seem to believe that we are currently discriminating against Scots and that we should instead discriminate against foreigners, have you ever lived in another country? And you seem to have overlooked the difference between current UK policy and the poll’s results regarding; nuclear weapons, defence spending, nationalisation, faith schools, currency, the monarchy and nuclear power.

    32. Seasick Dave says:

      Marc
       
      Vote No and you will certainly see change; for the worse.
       
      This is only a poll on an Independence supporting site, not government policy (whatever government that may be after Independence).
       
      A YES vote is about deciding about the direction we want our lives in Scotland to take and making these decisions on the basis of what voters in Scotland want, NOT what voters in the rest of Britain want, which is different.
       
      Westminster is corrupt and broke, Holyrood isn’t.
       
      You choose.
       
      I’m choosing Yes.

    33. Tommy says:

      Does anyone think that faith based schooling is really a critical issue in Scottish politics? I don’t, except to the extent that maintaining a union with England would help protect faith based schools from the large number of anti-Catholic bigots we have in Scotland.

    34. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      How on Earth do you figure that?

    35. Ken Johnston says:

      This is strange.
      Re my post at 9.44.
      I have FF and IE running side by side just now. IE shows the survey live and FF only has the results. No voting blocks or sections    at all.
      strange.
       

    36. Helena Brown says:

      As a woman who has always been interested in Politics I find that many of my contemporaries are not, most just seem to go with what ever flow is around. They will often vote as their parents or Husband does.
      I have no idea how you change things but they really do need changing.

    37. Ron Sturrock says:

      A lot of the questions were leading, e.g. should the wealthy pay more tax, the vote was in favour by a wide margin as yes, no surprise there. But what do you class as wealthy, someone who earns 25/50 quid a week more than you. 
      I also think that only approx 33% are over 55, and there may be a generational aspect to the results.
      Re immigration, although in favour, it should not be at the expense of denying our our own nationals, especially the young to develop. Something along the lines of a points based system should be considered.
      Just as well you did not ask earnigns range, I would have lied.
       
       

    38. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      “A lot of the questions were leading, e.g. should the wealthy pay more tax”

      Um, that’s not what the question says.

    39. Atypical_Scot says:

      Overall results are quite a surprise in a pleasing way, not that I hit the general view. Very surprised with the age results but that does explain the health results. 

    40. Lynn MacRae says:

      Hey Rev, sorry I’m a little late to the party here, only just seen this survey. Been too pre-occupied with reading all the threads (excellent stuff as always from you and the regular commenters). 
      As a woman who is interested in politics and read this site and others daily, I often speak to my female friends about it. They’re just not that interested in reading about or watching politics, too busy with family, home life and work. However, almost all I have asked will be voting Yes next year as they see it as the only option to provide their children a better future.
       

    41. Mathew says:

      If an independent Scotland would look anything like these polls suggest, I’d almost certainly vote yes!  It would be interesting to see what the overall Scottish opinion on these issues would be in a methodical, weighted poll.

    42. Neil Farren says:

      Neil Farren
      31

      EDITED BY REVSTU: Neil, did you mean to publish your full address and phone number here?

    43. LMN says:

      Nuclear Weapons out but keep nuclear power stations 

    44. Ally says:

      I’m female & very interested in politics. I have read Scotland’s Future and it seems to me that it’s a wish list full of empty promises like the fliers we have fluttering through the letterbox during elections. Free this/free that and higher taxes for the wealthy who will just move elsewhere, taking their businesses with them! I have voted for SNP in the past but since they got into power I have become less and less convinced that independence is the way forward. Utter nonsense. I hope that female voters have the intelligence to see this for themselves and don’t, as someone suggested “go with the flow” and vote for whoever their husband votes for (sexist or what? & from a woman! I despair).
       
      Interesting debate though it’s obviously been completed by Yes voters. Other polls suggest No is the answer. Maybe Salmond will come up with something (anything!) to explain where the money is coming from to change minds….we shall see…

    45. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      Have you applied the same scrutiny to the No camp’s future plans? (If so, please let us know where you found them.) How do you think Scotland will afford its current services with billions slashed from its budgets?

    46. Glass Girl says:

      Abby, I am a female interested in politics too and I felt compelled to write something as I really don’t understand some of the conclusions you seem to have reached. Firstly, if you have read Scotlands Future then well done for taking the time to do so – I downloaded it when it was released but have been unable to get through the whole thing yet due to being very busy in the run up to Christmas (hopefully I’ll have the time to finish reading it during the holidays) I cannot promise you that all the proposals in the white paper will come to fruition but to tar it with a brush created by decades of UK government broken promises and disappointments and then use this as a reason to stay in the union seems a very unfair to me. Your argument seems to be basically politicians lie, these politicians must be lying too, so lets stick with the ones that have already proven themselves to be liars time and time again. The SNP seem to have delivered a much larger proportion of their pre-election promises than any of the recent UK governements have. I do not claim that they are perfect but for my money they seem a great deal more trustworthy. However this referendum is not about them so that is by-the-by.
       
      As far as I am aware, many businesses are already in favour of independence so therefore must be willing to accept the tax proposals but even if they are not most business men and women are not going to up sticks and move just because the tax rate changes a bit.  They would weigh everything up and consider how it impacts all aspcts of their business . Many most likely have premises that have been kitted out at significant expense  for their specific needs, an established  customer base they may have worked to build up over many years, a skilled workforce that they have trained etc etc etc. The point is that tax is only one consideration and most cases probably not incentive enough to relocate. 
       
      I agree with your next point and I also hope that more female voter get invovled and seek out the information the need to make the choice that is right for them. It is not for you or I to dictate to other women which choice is intelligent and it is their democratic right to come to such a decision on their own. Obviously given the readership of this website the result is showing yes for the main question although personally I was more interested in seeing how those voters answered the other questions relating to what they wanted an independant Scotland to look like. 
       
      It seems to me that money to fund additional proposals (some services are currently free in Scotland and must already built in to the budget) should be realocated from projects the Scottish people no longer wish or need to fund such as Trident and the new high speed rail link and also by finding ways to grow the Scottish economy in the long term which has been pretty stagnant under the UK government.

    47. mamaclanger says:

      I notice a couple of comments about would be nice to have more non SNP supporters.
      I voted SNP for Holyrood and Westminster for the last elections but that does NOT make me an SNP supporter. I voted that way as I felt it was right for me at the time. Also where I live there isn’t much point doing otherwise.

      If there was a decent socialist option locally they would probably get my vote in future tbh. I am very much one of those awkward floating/tactical voters 🙂

    48. Mary Bruce says:

      I’m female, mid 40s and until this referendum had very little interest in politics. Now I’m obsessed. And like other people commenting above, although I voted SNP in 2010 and 2011, I didn’t previously. My move to SNP was probably motivated by the fact that there was no-one else left to vote for. I’m so glad we have the SNP, the disillusioned voters in England only have UKIP to move to, poor them.

    49. Howard Kennedy says:

      I couldn’t answer the question on taxation because it doesn’t have a suitable answer for my views.

      I would prefer a simplified system with a personal tax threshold of £15,000 and a flat rate of 25% on anything above. End National Insurance but replace Employer’s N.I. with an employee pension fund contribution. Total prohibition on companies having access to funds in the emloyee pension fund. Local income tax set by Councils within a range fixed by Government. Business tax at 10% but tightly controlled to prevent evasion with directors personally liable. Tax rate of 30% on share dividends and other un-earned income. Get rid of inheritance tax altogether. Capital Gains Tax at 15%o on gains above £300,000 threshold.

    50. jesssnowden says:

      Disappointing there r so few women for independence x

    51. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      Actually it’s “so few women on politics websites”.

    52. Nicola says:

      Im a female and have only just noticed the surveys tab on this site (probably because usually i have one or two of my three sons climbing over my back or hanging on to my hair to support him in his quest to start walking lol) otherwise i would have been here sooner lol

      We do read it honest x x

    53. Elaine says:

      On women contributors, this woman says it’s not that women aren’t interested in politics (after all, those decisions impact our lives a lot – child benefit, free health care, minimum wage…), it’s that politics isn’t interesting to women, or interested in women. While that’s the case, most women don’t have the inclination or the luxury of the time to spend ferreting out the good stuff i.e. here, they just pass it all by.

      Politics is still petty arguing by boring antagonistic blow hards who (in women’s eyes) have no concept of women’s everyday lives, or the problems or important issues therein. In politics no one from the group ‘vast majority of women’ is talking to that group. It’s not represented. Or seen.

      It’s tough to be in that group and maintain a career in politics, obviously. (When you are the main carer for your family and have a husband and home, and spend so much time fitting in work, either you embrace being a non stop high octane super hero or something has to give.) Even when it’s done, the lives of the women are cut out. I mean, the input they offer is framed in the same context as is all the other.

      The job that women do that isn’t renumerated goes on in the background. We don’t see it recognised or acknowledged in the mainstream narrative. Like hearing our husband’s constant golf post mortems, we weren’t there, it didn’t affect us. (There’s only so much momentum in the ‘thoroughly amusing’ tale of the bunker mishap before our enthusiasm cannot be maintained.) What matters is male opinion on male issues in a male world. This turns women off.

      The women’s world is still today a subset, when in reality it is the core of our society. It’s really only featured in advertising (women do do a lot of cleaning, juggling of family/work/home), but patronisingly so. It’s afforded no status.

      When it comes up as standard in relation to every issue, just like how every issue would affect the working man for example…when the two perspectives are mutually recognised and debated without making it a special debate around women – when we can do that without batting an eyelid, women readers won’t be so elusive.

      (Men can’t do that for us, of course. It is in part because men see woman as a bit of a mysterious other species that when it’s men behind the media, news, politics of course women’s side of things is left out. So I’m not saying this is all deliberate, but it hasn’t yet been deliberately tackled.)

      So right now Wings is a victim of circumstance.

    54. Elaine says:

      Howard.
      I agree with those critiquing the tax question. I had to tick ‘other’ because I disagreed with the rest.
      I identify a problem in the narrative of (unofficial) Scottish ‘Yes’ politics at the moment in that ‘the rich’ or ‘the wealthy’ are terms that are rather too easily bandied about. I would recommend caution because ‘the’ anything, e.g. ‘the gays’, ‘the blacks’, ‘the natives’ (!), ‘the English’…can dehumanise and lead to less than fair or pejorative opinions becoming acceptable.
      I’m not saying rich people are persecuted, however there is an unpleasant undercurrent where some voices (perhaps sometimes inadvertently) make the mistake of demonising those who have more than themselves. They’ve made the other group faceless. It’s when the aim of fairness and equality becomes treating others unfairly due to a chip on the shoulder i.e. bitter resentment dressed up as egalitarian moral high ground.
      Obviously I notice it on the Left. And it’s fine to have a range of valid vibrant opinion on how we can revitalise Scotland with this chance of independence. But divisive ‘them and us’ resentment is the last thing we need. It’s understandable, because the British papers have pit the poor against the privileged. But beware, such baggage should be left at the door.
      My view is against punitive taxation, which penalises those who earn more than the average for doing so. It has abandoned fairness for glee. High earners already bankroll the state with their tax contributions as a proportion of the whole. And it’s fair they should pay more (it’s not that they would be against paying their share – it’s a good thing). They ought not to be pilloried at the same time for doing so.
      I favour a flat rate of tax (including a lower earnings limit where no tax is due – I don’t know what the rate or limit should be). Someone earning ten times what another person earns would already pay tax ten times what the other person pays. I find taxing the first person again, even more on top, is based more on jealousy than integrity.
      It’s a handy fallacy that someone earning over £40k, say, therefore has oodles more spare cash in their pocket. The reality is they are spending it on owning their home, running their car, and all the associate costs, as well as feeding and bringing up their family – things we need them to do. It’s good for the economy, disastrous if they didn’t. It’s no valid excuse for punishing them with a higher tax rate. Because we happen to have less and need somebody to bash.
      We need to be super dispassionate and objective over tax.

    55. Grendel says:

      I’d change one of the Prisoners options to:

      Prisoners who will be eligible for release within the lifetime of the next parliament should have the vote.

      Elaine. I agree. My wage has now risen, and in theory I’m “well off”. In practice I dragged all my debt along with me, to join my negative equity on my mortgage. I would never dream to assume that because someone “earns” loads that it’s all pocket money.

    56. neil mackenzie says:

      I should have read all the answers properly 🙁

    57. neil mackenzie says:

      Judging by the predominantly male presence on here Wangs over Scotland might be a more appropriate site name.

    58. david anderson says:

      braw work canvassing opinion, all the pertinent issues.

    59. Les Wilson says:

      Could do this specifically for women and ask the other sites to contribute, it would be interesting and something involving for them, and everyone.

    60. Robert Peffers says:

      On taxation the main problem as applied to the United Kingdom is that what was once a mainly Direct taxation system, on income and wealth, PAYE), was first changed by Labour into an indirect, (upon goods and services). VAT, Road Fuel Duty, Alcohol Duty, Betting Tax, Tobacco Duty, et al.. This is why the gap between the rich and poor is increasingly ever widening. Even during a dire depression. The main taxation should properly be imposed upon, Disposable Income, (That sum remaining after the essential costs of basic living are deducted). Thus, in an independent Scotland a return to mainly direct taxation would bring about a fairer and less punative tax system that taxed mainly those best able to pay and that’s not just billionaire and millionaire people but includes those earning decent wages. It is utter madness to tax most heavily those you are paying benefits and allowances to. You must thus have big expensive government departments to first pay and regulate the benefits and allowances then more government departments to claw it back then another couple of government departments to police both systems and yet another to police the police.

    61. charles mair says:

      keep up the good work

    62. calum says:

      excellent survey, like the 13% greens got/get, and the ‘loaded’ questions were well done.

    63. Ambrose says:

      On emigration, my answer would be admit people we need, no other sentence was close.

    64. Robert Peffers says:

      On the subject of taxation, the general voting population don’t really grasp the true facts. So let’s first define some basic terms. All governments need access to funds to run the state. The question is, “Who though pays the main Burden of Taxation”? While this is the most basic precept of all taxation, that first question boils down to whether the system is mainly Direct or indirect, taxation.

      Direct taxation is levied upon income and wealth while indirect taxation is levied upon goods and service. Such taxes as PAYE, (income tax), Death Duty and Corporation Tax are all “Direct Taxation”, and provided the tax exemption bands are set to allow direct Taxation to affect only, “Disposable Income”, (Which term is defined as, “The total amount of money an individuals household in the community has available to buy consumer goods”), is fair and has those best able to pay tax actually paying the main burden of taxation.

      The United Kingdom’s taxation system was surreptitiously changed, mainly by the Labour Party, from, Direct to indirect taxation, and thus began the process of making the poorest on our society shoulder the main burden of taxation. Thus began the widening of the gap between the richest and the poorest people in the United Kingdom. The changes were mainly the Indirect Taxation of VAT, Road Fuel Duty, Alcohol Duty, Betting Tax, Tobacco Duty and the subsequent changes to the tax banding and tax cuts for the richest members of society.

      The Coalition government’s very first actions upon gaining power were to not only increase the VAT and so on, but to also include even more basic items to be taxed indirectly by them.. This was followed by cuts in the highest earner’s directly taxed Tax bands.

      Thus, < Indirect Taxation is taken without regard to the taxed families ability to pay and the billionaire share of it comes from his/her, “Disposable Income”, while the poorest folk have NO disposable income anyway. So, obviously, to have tncome tax variance powers are really quite meaningless and more so as the tax raised by Scotland would not gain a single penny for Scotland’s economy for any revenue raised by Scotland would be deducted from the capped Scottish Block Grant. These Westminster numpties seem to think we Scots really do button up the back of our heads.

    65. Catherine says:

      I find on many blogs, debating sites, etc. women’s comments are often being ignored (or is it just me?). Also I sometimes find the way people sometimes reply to each other quite off-putting (what utter rubbish, etc…)

    66. ramstam says:

      I’m not surprised at the lower numbers for women. This is probably the same on other sites but I don’t think this shows women are less involved in the Indy campaign. In my own family my wife and daughters are actively involved pro-indy on twitter and facebook etc. Is this a female thing ? Nae idea! but could be?

    67. Gregor says:

      What no option for my wife to give her views?

    68. Gregor says:

      Sorry I should have said I have given my views but my wife also has views and a vote.

    69. charlotte says:

      I am a female why do you think that women are not interested in politics?

    70. If the NHS in England is privatised surely there would have to be reciprocal arrangements between cities or regions or would the NoBs proscribe the northern part of the country

    71. lumilumi says:

      Got here through a link in the “emergency kitten” article today (1.6.2014).

      I think I’ve taken this interesting but unscientific survey before. It’d be nice to see if I’ve answered differently now and before. 😀

    72. Keith says:

      I am from South Africa with a British heritage with an objective view. Why is Westminster taking such a sudden interest in Scotland if Scotland is such a burden on the the UK. I love Scotland I will be prepared to pay more to restore this strong nation to It’s former glory. I feel that Scotland will not get independance as there are too many english up here living off the OIL. So, all Scotland can do, is show that WE are serious!!! FREEDOM!!!!!

    73. Jim says:

      According to the Daily Mail Scots are a nation of ‘subsidy junkies’ who rely on the generosity of English taxpayers to live the life of riley. (sorry Riley).

      So, if Scotland is costing the generous English taxpayers lots and lots of dosh just why does Westminster (and our own uncle Toms) want to hold on to us for?

      Do they look after us through the goodness of their hearts or are they keeping something from us?

      I will be voting Yes, and if they want to keep their pound let them, bring back the BawBee for all I care.

      If we vote No, then prepare for the backlash.

      Cutbacks? We ain’t seen anything yet.

      We have been warned.

    74. Ken says:

      ON immigration only those that have the qualifications needed to get work in this country should be admitted.

      they should also be able to support themselves for over two years so as not to depend on any hand outs.

      No one coming into this country should get any hand outs if they cannot show that they have a job to goto.

    75. Haggis says:

      When I try to take the survey I keep getting the message “Failed To Verify Referrer” when ever I select the vote button. Am I doing something wrong.

    76. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      “When I try to take the survey I keep getting the message “Failed To Verify Referrer” when ever I select the vote button. Am I doing something wrong.”

      You almost certainly don’t have Flash or Java installed.

    77. Jessie Manson says:

      Look forward to return on Tuesday.

    78. bjsalba says:

      Am female over 65 – I suspect from the numbers I am part of a select minority on this site.

      I was frustrated (as I always am when doing surveys) because the response I want to give is not listed. Usually because I want a more nuanced answer.

      Take prisoners having the vote, for example. First all prison votes should be postal – no ands ifs or buts, no trips to the polling station.

      Secondly when voting for a representation at any level of government, the prisoner should only be able to vote if their originally defined release date falls within the term of the position being voted on.

      Referenda are a different matter. I would think that all prisoners should be able to vote except those who are on whole life sentences.

      Trouble is that each question on the survey would need a set of answers of an essay length – whch is not really practicable.

    79. S' mise Garaidh says:

      Good so I can look forward to leaving one union and joining another, totally unfair that there is no representation for those of us who want an Indy Scotland out of the EUssr.

    80. Rev. Stuart Campbell says:

      “Good so I can look forward to leaving one union and joining another”

      No. You’re ALREADY IN the other one, you idiot.

    81. Johannes Climacus says:

      Rev. Stuart Campbell says:
      15 September, 2014 at 6:35 pm
      “When I try to take the survey I keep getting the message “Failed To Verify Referrer” when ever I select the vote button. Am I doing something wrong.”

      You almost certainly don’t have Flash or Java installed.

      I have the same problem and I almost certainly do. In fact, I definitely do have Flash and Java installed.

      My Mac would not be able to run any Adobe software without Java; perhaps you mean Javascript but I have that installed and enabled too.

      I have Flash version 18.0.0.232 installed and enabled.

      If I was cynical, I might think that this was a Labouresque attempt to marginalise my opinion for not sharing the same values. 😉

    82. Bob nugent says:

      all surveys are going to throw up anomiles, we have to take an over view we will never get it ALL right.
      The main things is we are ALL prepared to GET INVOLVED.
      That is always the failing people are readybto complain when they do not take time to fill in questions that effect them, this is your Scotland so if you do not get involved to improve ALL our Lot.

    83. Willie John says:

      On every question I got the response ” Failed To Verify Referrer”. What have I done wrong?

    84. John Sellars says:

      Hi Stuart,

      Is the Survey section of the WoS site working? I decided to do it and keep getting this:

      *beep*’Failed To Verify Referrer’*beep*

      I added the beeps.

      Thanks – J

    85. John Jones says:

      It is easy to solve the tax problems. Tax set at 5% on all income over £15.000, income means ALL earnings in UK, this includes TURNOVER from all businesses.( no allowances for any expenses same as PAYE )

    86. Flower of Scotland says:

      I’ve been on this site since 2013 and only realised that there was a survey!

      Filled it in today. Yep, really interesting. One of only a few female over 65s!

    87. Macandroid says:

      Och Flower of Scotland you only beat me to it by two months!



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