stooges of the Kremlin

Wings Over Scotland


One letter too many

Posted on November 26, 2017 by

(It’s nearly Christmas! Buy a cuddly Hamish The Lion toy here! Plus maybe some cartoon books.)
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    1. 26 11 17 11:56

      One letter too many | speymouth

    140 to “One letter too many”

    1. Alan mackintosh says:

      Good old murdo, getting the door slammed in his face again…

    2. Richard McIntosh says:

      Utter ?

    3. call me dave says:

      Excellent!

    4. heedtracker says:

      Aye, arsehole tories are on the march though. If they did’nt own the BBC shortbread gimp network, where would they be…

    5. Auld Rock says:

      Chris while quite brilliant as usual, however I think that this is far too sophisticated for even the average right winger???

    6. Betty Boop says:

      Personally, I think Murdo’s stupidity is under-rated…

      To H*** wi’ stupid Tories. Dundee, you are fabulous, awards or not! 🙂

    7. Gary45% says:

      Chris, BRILLIANT.
      Nice one.

    8. jimnarlene says:

      I bet he prints this out, frames it and hangs it on his bog wall.

    9. Robert Peffers says:

      Just to refresh the memories of Wingers :-

      In the ancient Roman, pre-Christian religion Janus is/was the god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages, and endings. He is shown with two faces, because he always looks both ways – both to the future and to the past.

      Chris is indeed the expert at hitting nails on the head whine Murdo is the expert of – well nothing really.

    10. Robert Peffers says:

      @jimnarlene says: 26 November, 2017 at 10:23 am:

      “I bet he prints this out, frames it and hangs it on his bog wall.”

      Dinna be daft, jimnarlene, Murdo’s cludgie wa’ has nae room fir a Chris Cartoon – its ower fu o photies o Murdo.

    11. Capella says:

      Whenever Murdo hears the word “culture” he reaches for his Daily Mail.

    12. Muscleguy says:

      Thanks a bunch Brexiters. With the new V&A having taken final shape and being internally fitted out now we were perfectly placed.

      When it was being planned the V&A in London sniffly said nothing of their’e was going in it. But now it turns out quite a bit will be. Scottish stuff, languishing in the faults in South Ken instead of being on display.

      With Duncan of Jordnanston School of Art and Design turning out new young designers it won’t be short of new display items either.

      This scientist is right behind it.

      If only we had voted Yes back in 2014 . . .

    13. Muscleguy says:

      Oh and is NOT nearly Christmas, we are in full on Birthday season. I’ve just had mine, next is a wee boy of our fond acquaintance then my wife followed by the wee boy’s mother.

      Traditionally in our house Xmas is removed on Jan 30. Hogmanay doesn’t start until the evening, because that is our eldest’s birthday.

      Xmas is a distracting side show in all this birthday stuff.

    14. galamcennalath says:

      As well as being two faced, the God Janus is the master of gates, doorways, and new beginnings. For Scotland, that should symbolise starting down the road to being an independent country. I am certain it won’t be stepping back into full fledged Unionism under the Tories!

      The Establishment is clearly pushing Davidson as their salvation in Scotland. IMO that’s a big mistake, for them, so I’m glad they are making it! They’ll get the hardcore BritNat vote, but that’s all.

    15. galamcennalath says:

      Muscleguy says:

      If only we had voted Yes back in 2014 . . .

      Indeed {sighing deeply}

      But hey, IndyRef2 is on the horizon and we can get it right this time!

      Our new state will need to set up the currently missing apparatus of statehood. Umpteen ministries covering the the reserved powers which will transfer to Scotland, IMO we need to de-centralise from the word go and places like Dundee, Ayrshire, Fort William, and Moray should get new government ministries. With that comes jobs, communication, services , and of course wider cultural investment.

    16. Bob Mack says:

      Perhaps two letters short. Sejanus was the guy who ran the Pretoria guard and turned it into something corrupt which held influence over every aspect of Roman life.

      Murdoch has turned the Tory Party into the camp of the Orange Order in Scotland, filling the Tory ranks with every bigot and zealot in the land who now vote and represent Tory ,who would traditionally be a working class enemy. He is attempting to sectarianise politics.

      We could learn a lot from the past. (Sejanus was eventually bumped off by his boss). Beware the ides of March Murdoch.

    17. Ken500 says:

      Brexit still hasn’t happened. Wait until it does. A culture bid is nothing to what is in store. Just the start.

      Unless the Tories do their usual. Less rights and decision making for more money. What a mess. It is just horrendous, Every day more problems created. ‘Stong and stable’? Slight exaggeration!

      Murdo Fraser!! How can folk vote for that?

    18. Jockanese Wind Talker says:

      Murdo Fraser, Janus wi a silent J

      Got his (J)anus handed to him at FMQs this week an a’

      🙂

    19. Dave McEwan Hill says:

      Is that Hugh Janus?

    20. Ken500 says:

      A Tory Brexiteer giving a good case in relationship to NI for staying in the EU. What a plonker.

      The UK did not vote to leave, England/Wales voted to leave. The majority wanted to stay. Increasing every day.

    21. Ottomanboi says:

      An overview of contemporary high culture in the context of the continent of Europe might struggle to find anything worthwhile ‘to rate’. What Hitler’s evil gang didn’t destroy in Europe anglo-american Sky ‘entertainment’, google, twitter, facebook, snapchat and instagram and other narcissistic ephemera are drowning in a mentally stultifying sea of triviality. Great culture needs more than a couple of seconds of attention. It needs intellectual challenge and strife not safety-first, political correctness. The insipid, comfort seeking mindset of latter-day Europe might find the reproduction of the cuckoo clock an effort.

    22. Highland Wifie says:

      While iScotland flourishes and becomes a vibrant culture of music, arts, dance and language, what’s left of the UK will become a cultural desert, starved of resources and withering on the vine.

      The Tories wouldn’t know a valuable cultural asset if it smacked them in the face. All sacrificed in the name of ‘taking back control’

    23. defo says:

      Nice rendering of the MF Chris. You really captured his glaikitness.

    24. Ken500 says:

      Some biased broadcasters. Do not seem to understand the Police/judiciary are supported to be separate from the Legislatory. Some Police authorities have been corrupt for years. Labour – unionist control. Historical, Fifty years of Labour. Masonic.

      All the political Parties supported Police Scotland formation. There were controlled by local authority, often political bias. House in Glasgow. Sectarianism supported in the central belt by Police under illegal political authority. Divide and rule. Same with the Media. Controlled by Labour/unionists. Needs flushed out.

      The bad apples in the Police are being flushed out.

    25. galamcennalath says:

      Any Brexit which does not retain full single market membership will bad things, and absolutely nothing but bad things! No UK city being European Culture centre is just the tip of a big floating turd.

      There is no up-side, there is no silver lining. We hear about financial services abandoning the floundering ship, but you don’t have to look far in the news to find more …

      ” American healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson has pulled out of a plan to build a new research and development facility in the UK amid concerns about the economy. “

      http://archive.is/3uApV

      … this is going to be repeated over and over across the UK. Why would any sane company want to invest in a state which is throwing away the best trading links on the planet and intent on contracting its economy by as much as 10%?

    26. Famous15 says:

      The barrow boys of er Barrow voted for Brexit and now we will all experience the delights of living in a nation of barrowboys.

      Personally I prefer a kipper to Janus!

    27. Don`t really get the references apart from the (j) in janus thing,

      What`s the yoon gimp been up to now ?

      anyhoo,

      went to see Alex Salmond being interviewed by Prof T Devine last night in Edinburgh,

      very entertaining great stories from Alex,but 2 hours hardly scraped the surface of `oor Alex` life story,(with Alex in full flow you would need two months 🙂

      why the red trousered detritus of Gordon voted out one of UK`s best politicians for a no name right wing zealot is a stain on the history of the county.

    28. PictAtRandom says:

      O/T: I see that Yahoo!News has just republished “Digital Minister: I’m fed up with SNP botching broadband so millions will go directly to Scottish councils” from yesterday’s Torygraph. (Usually the question with Yahoo journalism is whether the “news” is 3 days, 3 weeks or 3 months old.) I suppose it highlights the messy division of responsibilities in this area. You’d think that The Most Powerful Devolved Wee Parliament In The World would have complete control, wouldn’t you?
      And I see that one commenter suggests that, in any event, the bottleneck has been caused by OpenReach failing to upgrade their boxes in time to allow connection.

    29. Ken500 says:

      If the Tories hold Scotland back they hold the British economy back. Hold the world economy back.

      Illegal wars, financial fraud and tax evasion. Hold the world economy back. Westminster policies. Scotland outvoted 10 to 1. No Democracy. Electoral systems imposed on Scotland without consent. SNP out voted 6 to 1. To try and keep unionist control.

      How to cut taxes in Scotland. Independence. Stop paying rest of the UK debt. Mismanagement and misappropriating of Scottish revenues and resources.

      Illegal wars, financial fraud and tax evasion. Westminster corrupt governance.

      Trident, Hinkley Point, HS2, Heathrow all a total waste of public money on groteque projects of little value. £30Billion a year of borrowed money. With cheaper, feasible alternatives. Half the cost. £13Billion a year of essential services cuts. Education/NHS/Welfare,

      What has political public affairs go to do with some journalists. Except extra remuneration. Unelected biased dunces. Flush out the unionist press in Scotland.

    30. gus1940 says:

      Re above comment – Praetorian Guard NOT Pretorian.

      Having recorded it earlier I have just watched our rotund Hon. Lt Col on Marr.

      Typical powder puff interview allowing her to spout her usual load of Jackie Baillie.

      Interestingly the interview was totally devoted to the National UK Tory Govt.and its alleged triumphs – not a mention of Scotland.

      One would be mistaken in thinking that she is a major National (UK) politician and not just leader of one of the minority opposition parties at Holyrood.

    31. Chick McGregor says:

      Nice one Chris, But where did the ‘J’ come from?

    32. galamcennalath says:

      Brexit, the turd that just won’t flush away ….

      – Brexit will cost Britain £72 billion in lost economic activity annually, according to an analysis of government figures.

      – Leaving the EU is already dragging down the British economy.

      – The UK is now growing more slowly than Japan or Italy.

      http://archive.is/RZlEr

      ‘Floating vote’ Scots need to open their eyes, commit to Yes, and let’s get out of this fiasco.

    33. harry mcaye says:

      You missed a trick there, Chris. Back page could have said “Queen’s Eleven humped again!”

    34. Ken500 says:

      The Scottish Gov can re adjust Council’s funding allocation. Westminster administration, illegal interference re broadband funding can be countered in this case. Not always.

      Westminster give the £2Billion broadband extension contract exclusive to BT. How was it administrated and allocated?. BT was fined on numerous occasions for bad workmanship and malpractice etc. BT was losing £2Billion on an illegal Italian subsidy. The Chairman did not resign but lost the extravagant bonus. For fees and donations? To a political Party. Political influenced board appointments.

      The Scottish Gov allocated £400Million more, additional, to extend broadband cover. Now 95% Rest difficult landscape but being done.

      Broadband cover will increase Independence support as more people come on board.

    35. Dr Jim says:

      I need to get this straight in my thick head
      “journalists” who refuse to reveal the names of criminal informants who may or may not be lying about whatever they inform about, because they are criminals, accuse the police of not revealing the names of police officers who may or may not be guilty of something

      And then the BBC complains to the Scottish government about it on “behalf of the public” who really don’t care as long as whatever it is is resolved

      So is what “journalists” are saying is that they and only they have the right to accuse and print names of folk all over the place, innocent or guilty, and no scrutiny of “journalists” should ever apply because they’re above the law when they say so

      This is the same kind of “journalism” that trod all over the rights of Michelle Thomson for years ruining her career and is still doing it to a proven innocent woman

      Leveson didnae work very well did it when “journalists” still think the rules don’t apply to them because they’re more important than the rest of us

    36. Chick McGregor says:

      harry
      “You missed a trick there, Chris. Back page could have said “Queen’s Eleven humped again!””

      Or

      ‘Thirldom Thirteen’ to be renamed ‘Baker’s Dozen’. 🙂

    37. heedtracker says:

      Hurrah for the tories, or is it huzzah for the tories. They’re very alike toryboy’s, Murdo, Jeremy, my Slovene girlfriend, cookie cutter toryboys.

      https://www.standard.co.uk/news/politics/jeremy-hunt-prepares-for-tory-leadership-bid-as-he-sets-his-sights-on-downing-street-a3701931.html

    38. Macbeda says:

      I would have thought the rear face should have resembled a horses arse tbh.

    39. Croompenstein says:

      You missed a trick there, Chris. Back page could have said “Queen’s Eleven humped again!”

      Murdo willnae be singing that song about Dundee-Hamilton after the last 2 results.. 🙂

    40. heedtracker says:

      Another janus face. Future UK PM Colonel Ruth’s really something right enough, if you’re the beeb gimp network.

      Herald
      12 hrs ago
      Ruth Davidson in ‘hypocrisy’ row over donation from climate change sceptic
      Exclusive by Paul Hutcheon
      THE Scottish Tories have been accused of “shameless” hypocrisy over their support for the environment after a senior MP benefited from a donation from a climate change sceptic.

      MP John Lamont’s local party received £2,000 from currency expert Neil Record, who has helped fund the controversial Global Warming Policy Foundation.Investigations Editor

    41. galamcennalath says:

      Opinion piece in Independent …

      ” If you want to see how Brexit will really pan out, take a look at what’s happened to the European Capital of Culture

      Five candidate cities have already spent up to £500,000 on their final bids, but on Thursday the UK’s access to the European Capital of Culture was pulled “

      http://archive.is/vjBDl [text only]

    42. galamcennalath says:

      Hawd on a wee minute there!

      The 2023 European Capital of Culture contenders are Dundee, Nottingham, Leeds, Milton Keynes and Belfast.

      I for one most certainly hope, expect even, that at least one of those cities will be in the EU or EEA in 2023! 🙂

    43. OT.,the unionist are always telling us how bad Scotland would be outside the union but has anyone done a study of how bad the rest of the U.K. Would be without Scotland’s input to them ???imean I do not want to deprive anyone especially children of anything but already people and children in Scotland are better of than in the rest of the U.K. And that’s thanks to a caring SNP government

    44. Socrates MacSporran says:

      I am wondering if someone at Tory Central Office set-up Colonel Yadaftie on the Andrew Marr Show this morning.

      It was certainly the usual generally soft Marr interview of a Tory, but, on the few occasions he turned-up the heat, the Colonel was floundering somewhat.

      Maybe a case of some top Tory reminding her fans in England: “Really, as you can see, she’s not that good – leave her with Jocks, but we don’t think she could handle the important English stuff.”

    45. Ruby says:

      https://tinyurl.com/y72e8kkw

      Link to Ruth Davidson on Andrew Marr for those like me who don’t have access to BBC

      Big thank-you to Peter Curran

      https://tinyurl.com/y7th5pxk
      Andrew Marr Sunday Papers – 26th November

    46. Dan Huil says:

      British nationalist bigot, Murdo Fraser, is an ignoramus. [Ignoranus?]

      He thinks culture is something you see in Burton’s windae.

      Meanwhile Westminster looks set to betray Fraser’s OO friends in the north of Ireland. Disnae metter where he looks the so-called united kingdom continues to self-destruct.

    47. heedtracker says:

      Link to Ruth Davidson on Andrew Marr for those like me who don’t have access to BBC

      Thanks Ruby, nice display of Colonel Ruth waffle too. Colonel Ruth waffle on low productivity in particular.

      If you’re not getting a decent wage for your work and the average UKOK CEO is, maybe that’s a problem, teamGB productivity wise.

      Even stinky olde Graun tories are interested.

      https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/mar/22/uk-ceos-national-living-wage-equality-trust-pay-gap

      Executive pay and bonuses
      FTSE CEOs ‘earn 386 times more than workers on national living wage’

    48. heedtracker says:

      Another planet toryboy triumph. My works were bought over by a global FTSE corp a while back, with CEO pay at 386 times more than workers on national living wage’

      What Graun toryboy’s leave out, that there are literally hundreds more CEO wannabees, just below the CEO’s, all also earning only 286 times the average living wage.

      http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/uk-living-standards-fall-longest-60-years-records-began-economy-household-incomes-costs-energy-a8071146.html

      Only in teamGB, do we keep voting in toryboys who exist simply to enrich themselves and their class.

    49. Hamish100 says:

      it may suit May to have NI the backdoor route to the EU via efta. Just think of all the wee tax dodges possible. One thing though it will negatively impact on Scotland unless we get out of the union with right wing brexit England supported by Corbyn.

    50. CameronB Brodie says:

      British nationalism should be considered as being similar to an Anglophile cult (see BLiS___d). Scottish independence would emasculate the Conservative and Unionist party’s identity, which has been constructed around the notion of England’s yoonion with a submissive Scotland. This would be a blessing to the world, IMHO.

      @BLiS___d
      Enough’s enough!

      The Values of Europe: family, work, society, politics and religion

      History – combining elements of Antiquity, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, the Renaissance and the Enlightenment – has created an array of indisputable values, to which the European Union pays lip service, but which it often regards simply as pretty packaging for the things that really matter. But aren’t these values what really matter, and are not they, on the contrary, what give direction to all the rest?” – Vaclav Havel, European Parliament, 2009

      https://europeanmission.redcliffe.ac.uk/vista-communicating-research-and-innovation/the-values-of-europe-family-work-society-politics-and-religion/

    51. Tinto Chiel says:

      Nice ‘toon, Chris, but what does Janu mean?

    52. galamcennalath says:

      “…. discussing Labour’s position on Brexit with Dugdale. “Whatever that is,” murmured the absentee MSP for Lothian …. “

      Ouch!

      Has anyone a scooby what Labour’s position is?

      ” If Corbyn has concluded that Brexit (even a soft one) will impoverish Britain, render it globally irrelevant, narrow the life chances not just of today’s children but of their future children, weaken its commitment to human rights, permanently damage the jobs market, threaten the long term viability of the NHS, and generally launch Britain on an irreversible downward spiral… if he genuinely thinks that, he needs to say so out loud.”

      Will he, won’t he?

      http://archive.is/mVQYZ
      [text only, some of the article at bottom after comments]

    53. Jockanese Wind Talker says:

      The default position of BritNat Labour @galamcennalath says at 3:49 pm is simple

      It is that they don’t have a Scooby what BritNat Labour’s position is.

      Earlier this week:

      “The Labour leadership whipped MPs to vote down Murray’s amendment to a “ways and means” motion on the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) bill. The former shadow Scotland secretary had drawn up the change in an attempt to exempt EU goods from customs duties after Brexit, therefore keeping Britain in the customs unions.”

      http://archive.is/kOLuv

      Today:

      “The latest incarnation of Barry Gardiner’s Brexit position was on the show. The Shadow International Development Secretary had previously said it would be a disaster to stay in the customs union after Brexit, and remaining in the Single Market would leave the UK a “vassal state””

      “Speaking to Marr, he said Labour had not ruled staying in either “off the table”. He said Labour recognised the benefits of staying in “a customs union” with the EU.”

      http://archive.is/PcqCf

      So they vote against it in Westminster then say it is still on the table, classic BritNat Labour Bullshit.

    54. Ken500 says:

      Davidson is the patsy. Other Tories from the South will not appear. Or they will get slated for the mess. She appears being a wee big further North. Can’t be held to account? Bumps up her self importance. Most of them in Scotland unelected 3rd rates rejects. On an electoral system not mentioned. Another unionist fraud. Marr and the galloping regimental sergeant major.

    55. Ken500 says:

      What is Labour’s position? Anything that keeps them in their cushy number. Even though it tanks the economy. Once again the unionists care more about staying in their seats, themselves, than the economy. They would, beg steal or borrow to keep their privileges. The only way they would turn is if their seats were threatened. That is starting to happen. Even more people want to stay in the EU then leave.

      Even the Murray amendment was just a show. A concession to his constituents who voted overwhelmingly to stay in the EU. It was never going to be accepted.

    56. Dan Huil says:

      From Chris Johns [Irish Times]

      “I’d heard of Michael Collins before I moved to Ireland through my (Irish) grandmother who, with a father from Clonakilty, was convinced she was related to someone who played a major role in the formation of modern Ireland. Hence, I was amused to learn of a family legend that claimed we were linked to a long-dead figure from Ireland’s revolutionary past. It’s only through living here for the last three decades that I began to know anything of the reality of Collins in particular and Ireland in general. One of the many things I learned is that Irish interest in Britain is not reciprocated. I was ignorant before I came here and most of my countrymen remain so today.

      It is to the discredit of the British government that they continue a baleful tradition of assuming things about foreigners that have few roots in fact. It’s partly about history. The fiction that Britain joined an economic union in 1973 and was subsequently shocked by the discovery of a political heart beating at Europe’s core is maintained in every discussion of Brexit. There is no awareness either of history or the deeply held continental view that politics comes first. It’s not a belief in politics versus economics but more that unless the politics are right prosperity is always under threat. The political primacy of ever closer union has always been visible and readily apparent to anyone who has ever read the first chapter of any European history book.

      Every British negotiator in the run-up to 1973 knew about Europe’s politics. They were confronted with reality every time they met their counterparts at the negotiating table. And they were properly briefed by the British Civil Service. Many high-profile British politicians like (Tory) Prime Minister Ted Heath and (Labour, ex-communist) Chancellor Denis Healy had distinguished second World War records and experiences that meant they had views wholly aligned with Europe’s federalists. But too many of them, aware of the visceral hostility to Europe running through many members of the two main political parties, played down the political truth and spoke only of the economics.
      Left also ignore facts

      The British public was told, repeatedly, that Europe in practice meant only a free trade zone. All the rest, it was asserted, was continental waffling. The Tory right has campaigned against Europe for the subsequent 40-plus years, sinking ever deeper into a Empire-centric nostalgia as rooted in historical fact as my grandmother’ blood links to Michael Collins. Parts of the Labour Party have been as deluded but from a different perspective: the EU is a capitalist conspiracy against workers. This thinking leads directly to the sight, this week, of Jeremy Corbyn voting alongside David Davis for departure from the customs union. The left also ignore facts: workers rights enshrined in EU law and the awesome gift of freedom of movement (not least to where the jobs are).

      An awareness of Irish history – even a nodding acquaintance – would appreciate what happened to Collins, the first and last Irish politician to sign up to a hard border. The idea that Leo Varadkar, or anybody else in this Republic, would, under any circumstances, sign up to another border displays so much ignorance, so much arrogance, so much stupidity that I am left wondering about all those stereotypes of my fellow Brits. Stereotypes that I have wearily tried to reject and counter over the last 30 years.

      Brexit has poisoned British political life and it now threatens something similar for relations between the UK and Ireland. Being a Brit in Ireland has mostly been a smooth experience for this immigrant. The cultural differences between the two islands run deeper than many of us care to admit but Ireland does a terrific job of assimilation. It may be coincidence but I was, for the first time ever, the other day told to ‘f**** off back to where you come from’ (I never lost the accent). Was this a small Brexit effect?
      Ignorance of history

      Ignorance of history and zero appetite for the details of European law have combined to produce the current chaos. How can the British not realise that a customs union logically and legally necessitates a hard border between those inside and outside that union? It really is as simple as that. And how can they not realise what the reemergence of a Border actually means?

      There is a solution involving recognition of the economic union that currently exists between North and South. There already are regulatory differences between the North and Britain. This logic could be extended to include the North in a sort-of customs union with the Republic. Imagination and goodwill are, however, needed.

      We have heard so much in recent days about how the British have been taken by surprise the supposed hard line taken by the Irish. Similar expressions of astonishment and disbelief are heard whenever the EU reiterates it’s negotiating principles. Somebody should explain to UK politicians about EU law and Irish history. There is no other option open to Varadkar other than the line he is taking. Explain to Davis and May what happened after Collins signed up to a hard border. This isn’t going to end well.”

    57. North chiel says:

      Confirmation today now that the U.K. is officially “ all at sea” with the Royal Navy now
      taking over after the “ changing of the guard” ceremony at “ the palace”.

    58. ronnie andeson says:

      O/T
      Big hoo haa about the Senior service taking over the guarding duties at Buck Hoose the next big change will be the Scots Guards urnae guarding Buck Hoose , canny hiv they rebellious Scots Regiment guarding Betty .

    59. ronnie andeson says:

      @ North chiel great minds am aw that lol.

      Betty wull hiv tae buy ah alarm clock shortly the Bagpipes will be silenced lol , aye its all change at buck hoose windsor castle balmoral & holyrood hoose .

    60. Grouse Beater says:

      I like the two-headed bust, Chris, symbolic of the Tories not knowing which way to go. I’d prefer they just go!

      Your weekend reading:

      Scotland the English Colony: https://wp.me/p4fd9j-mcb
      Car predictions: https://wp.me/p4fd9j-jpx

    61. Ian Brotherhood says:

      @Dan Huil (5.07) –

      Thanks for posting that piece – very interesting.

      😉

    62. heedtracker says:

      CameronB Brodie says:
      26 November, 2017 at 3:01 pm
      British nationalism should be considered as being similar to an Anglophile cult (see BLiS___d). Scottish independence would emasculate the Conservative and Unionist party’s identity,

      Tis true CameronB. From March, Teresa kicks arse but strong and stable tory catastrofuck GE is only months away

      http://archive.is/bG4TO

      Theresa May: I will not allow Scotland and England to ‘drift apart’ after Brexit

      The speech came after Ruth Davidson, the Scottish Tory leader, told the Telegraph that the Unionists would win another vote by an even larger margin but hinted that Mrs May would not allow a rerun of the 2014 vote until after Brexit.

      Mrs May told the Glasgow conference: “As Britain leaves the European Union and we forge a new role for ourselves in the world, the strength and stability of our Union will become even more important.”

      It is the torygraph but its the tories all right, a minority, in both Scotland and England, dictating what the majority will do, because they are tories.

    63. galamcennalath says:

      Dan Huil says:

      Brexit has poisoned British political life and it now threatens something similar for relations between the UK and Ireland.

      I read that article earlier and it gives a very good insight into the UK attitudes and how they got into this mess.

      A repeated theme seems to be how the Tories are surprised when something everyone else seems to know and understand comes in front of them. Being blinkered is a big understatement.

      This Sky News article also gives a good overview of the situation ….

      ” Ireland: The Brexit riddle Britain forgot – When the history of Brexit is written, it might not be over trade or rights, but on the effects of a peace settlement in Ireland. “

      http://archive.is/Bkpja

      The UK has for a couple of centuries been obsessed with trade and making profits. The present day Tory mind doesn’t seem to have moved beyond the Imperial past. Our near neighbours, by contrast, focus on politics. Perhaps this is because so many wars occurred. I include Ireland. The current negotiations are primarily political but the Tories haven’t got their heads round that, yet.

    64. Liz g says:

      Dan Hull @ 5.07
      Very interesting post Dan.
      If they don’t know the situation… They should have!
      I suspect that they did and that they either don’t care or, they a actually do want rid of Northern Ireland.

      Hanging on to the North never made any sense to me.
      I always assumed that it was designed to hold the republic back where ever they could.
      Now because Ireland is under the umbrella of Europe,the North only has value to Westminster.
      In that it could be a potential headache for Dublin on a reunification that Westminster gets to interfere in.
      Westminster doesn’t give a shit about Northern Ireland and never did.
      If they cared about the people at all they would never have dreamed about an EU referendum until Northern Ireland was settled.
      My auld Da used to say “if what was happening in Northern Ireland was happening just outside London it would have been sorted out in a fortnight”.

    65. Gary45% says:

      One letter too many could also have been CHUNT, that would also have been VERY appropriate.
      But I suppose you would also have had to put in useless, so maybe not? especially on the Sabbath.
      Murdo “Brendas Eleven” Fraser is not just a bigot he is also a maggot.

      Wee discussion with a lady member of staff in the local German hypermarket today.
      Referring to Brenda’s “wee gimp” Harry’s burd on the front page of the Sunday gutter press getting royal protection.
      She was not happy when I mentioned the headline, and agreed it was a waste of money to the tax payer. I said the only way to stop this waste was vote for Indy2, I wont say what her answer was but I am sure GBWO and Strictly Come ??? are high up in her agenda.
      Any Trolls, You vote Red/ Blue Tory, you get Tory “Don’t fu*king moan when it goes pear shaped”.

    66. heedtracker says:

      I say, how frightfully planet toryboy. Brexit bill very enraging for youre average Leaver apparently, solution? dont tell em Teresa. Whatever they say about Westminster, there aint no shyster like a tory shyster.

      http://archive.is/5Y12a

      Theresa May has agreed with Brussels that Britain will hand over more than £40bn when the UK leaves the EU — but keep the final bill secret from the public even when the final deal is done in 2019.

    67. Dr Jim says:

      Between the EU the Republic of Ireland, real voters in Norn Ireland and if Scotland gets a grip of itself we have the chance right now to grasp England by the throat with both hands and choke the bullying life out of it

      The Republic of Ireland must stay committed to their course Westminster can’t be trusted on anything whether written down or not

      Let’s choke them friendly and smiley like, just in the way they’ve done to everyone else always, and then when they think they’re getting comfortable batter them into submission again

      Because they’re worth it

    68. heedtracker says:

      The Republic of Ireland must stay committed to their course Westminster can’t be trusted on anything whether written down or not

      The Irish are far more powerful than the UK today simply by European Union being an actual democracy and that the Irish can veto any deal Teresa tries to make, any deal.

      Its the other end of the BBC vote tory spin machine, like how beeb r4 news gimps try to make Liam Fox look EU/Brexit sane tonight, and how he has the whip hand over Ireland’s border with this shithead union.

    69. stewartb says:

      Liz g @ 6.52pm

      “Westminster doesn’t give a shit about Northern Ireland and never did.
      If they cared about the people at all they would never have dreamed about an EU referendum until Northern Ireland was settled.”

      Your statement is just so true – when did either side of the UK (English) political class during the EU Ref debates make any reference to either pro- or con- implications for NI?

      And yet, the DUP and its ‘Loyalist’ supporters don’t seem to care – its as if any sacrifice by today’s population of NI, and by their descendants, is acceptable. It seems that a democratic vote to remain in the EU is as nothing when set against a willingness to sacrifice for the sake of ‘loyalism’ towards the very same State that gives them scant regard and to a Monarchy that is (just) silent …. and offers them tangibly what?

      But then the UK (English) political establishment has a long tradition of what is either a lack of awareness or (more likely) a lack of concern for issues of equity across all parts of the UK & NI.

    70. Lenny Hartley says:

      O/T and Stop Press, A mate in Australia has just told me that Kezia has been voted out the Jungle, she is to be replaced with Zoko Ono who has amazing survival skills, apparently she has lived off a dead beetle for thirty years!

    71. Thepnr says:

      If the UK was in anyway serious about making progress on the three so called red lines with the EU before negotiations on a trade deal can begin then the Secretary of State for NI James Brokenshire would be living more or less full time in Dublin.

      They are not interested though in their false belief that it can be dealt with later, later.

      That is delusional, the UK will obviously not have made sufficient progress come December to start discussing a future trade relationship with the EU. So far they have agreed on absolutely nothing. This though is the UK governments strategy which I believe will backfire.

      No matter what they say about the EU needing the UK, the neediest partner in this relationship is the UK. Yet our negotiators seem blind to that fact. Brexit will take the UK economy down the tubes and I hope the Tories along with it.

      Utter madness and that’s why Scotland must be Independent. I never voted for those that will destroy the economy in the UK as well as Scotland. Time to get out and elect a government that will make decisions for Scotland and those that live here.

      Over 70% of Scots rejected the Tories at the last GE, it’s plain to see why when you listen to the likes of Ruth Davidson or Murdo Fraser. Useless best describes them

    72. heedtracker says:

      But then the UK (English) political establishment has a long tradition of what is either a lack of awareness or (more likely) a lack of concern for issues of equity across all parts of the UK & NI.”

      Great satire, look at him run:D

      https://www.thepoke.co.uk/2017/11/24/seen-cartoon-better-nails-brexit/

    73. dakk says:

      ‘the very same State that gives them scant regard and to a Monarchy that is (just) silent …. and offers them tangibly what?’

      Separation from and dominance over Irish Catholics is enough for the bigots.

    74. galamcennalath says:

      Some stats about Northern Ireland

      2017 General Election
      DUP 36.0%
      Sinn Féin 29.4%
      SDLP 11.7%
      UUP 10.3%
      Alliance 7.9%

      From 2011 Census….

      Religion
      Roman Catholic 40.8%
      Presbyterian Church in Ireland 19.1%
      Church of Ireland 13.7%
      Methodist Church in Ireland 3.0%
      Other Christian 5.8%
      No religion and Religion not stated. 16.9%

      National Identity
      British 48.4%
      Irish 28.4%
      Northern Irish 29.4%

      Passport
      No passport 18.9%
      United Kingdom 59.1%
      Republic of Ireland 20.8%

    75. stu mac says:

      Know some here don’t think much of BellaC but this is worth a look.

      http://bellacaledonia.org.uk/2017/11/23/two-giants-go-head-to-head/

    76. Brian Doonthetoon says:

      I have a feeling that indyref2 is gonna be on the backburner – for just a wee whilie. The situation developing on the island to the west is gonna explode, politically typing.

      A positive vote in a consultative referendum on reunification, following on from the legislative situation in N. Ireland being sorted, would leave N. Ireland in the same position as E. Germany was, before the reunification of Germany.

      The EU had no problem with the expanded Germany, even though E. Germany had never been a member. N. Ireland conforms to all the EU rules, being a “province” of a member of the EU.

      The continuation of N. Ireland’s EU status in the above situation should be without doubt.

      As in Scotland, it just needs enough people with the guts to vote for it.

    77. Graeme says:

      Brian Doonthetoon says:
      26 November, 2017 at 9:30 pm

      As in Scotland, it just needs enough people with the guts to vote for it.

      It doesn’t take guts to vote for Indy it just takes common sense and anyone with common sense would need guts not to vote for it

    78. Brian Doonthetoon says:

      Hi Graeme at 9:40 pm.

      You typed,
      “It doesn’t take guts to vote for Indy it just takes common sense and anyone with common sense would need guts not to vote for it”

      You have to remember that there is a substational section of voters who don’t read Wings, or other pro-indy media. They get their input from the (largely) pro-unionist TV, radio and press.

      Thus, they have to take cognitive dissonance by the horns – and, I feel, that takes guts. To be able to recognise that one has been duped over the years must hurt.

    79. Lenny Hartley says:

      Seen this on Rev’s twitter feed , good idea.
      https://weegingerdug.wordpress.com/2017/11/26/to-indyapp-and-beyond/amp/

    80. Meg merrilees says:

      Tinto Chiel

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janus

      Here’s the explanation of Janus – a Roman god who looks in both directions… i.e. forward and back at the same time.

    81. defo says:

      Joke of the day Lenny, lol. (not the DC lol btw)

    82. heedtracker says:

      Also seen this on Rev twitter timeline

      Nicola’s No1 Comrade?
      @ChrisMcCusker67
      Nov 25

      Today is the 97th anniversary of when England invaded Scotland as Churchill sent the tanks in to stop a “socialist revolution” in Glasgow, with Scottish soldiers locked in barracks and all they wanted was fairness & equality. Same was done in Wales in 1910 with the miners.”

      Extremely English Channel 4’s got another war history thing with Guy Martin? about the invention of that WW1 tank that rolled into Glasgow.

      Its not that great a show but Martin explains how the UK war gov went round the country raising war bond funding for their new tank invention. Martin’s very bamboozled, that it was Glasgow that raised the highest amount for this tank, £14 million and he seems to want to say that the Scots are mean aren’t they, but settles for sensible.

      Yet within a few years, same tanks are rolling into Glasgow city centre, presumably ready to open fire, on the people that paid for them.

    83. stewartb says:

      Completely O/T

      Just noticed (not being a cricket follower) that the body that governs England’s test cricket is called the ‘England and Wales Cricket Board’ but it is also frequently (and formally) referred to as the ‘ECB’ – not the ‘EWCB’. Its logo has a crown and three lions.

      I had never spotted this before. All these (little) ways that English exceptionalism/superiority is expressed!

    84. Meg merrilees says:

      Just listened to the (t)Ruthless Davidson interview with Andrew Marr this morning.
      She’s got one answer only and keeps repeating that, expanding where necessary to fill time.

      But I thought she was vicious about 1min 30 seconds in –
      Marr talks about a toddler wanting to change the TV channel to CBCC ( not CBBC as he meant to say).
      Andrew Marr has had a stroke and can get muddled – I think he has done astonishingly well to return to TV and what does our Ruth do?… she mocks him for his verbal slip!!!

      ‘Turn over to where Andrew?’ with a big cheesy grin, forcing him to repeat it and thankfullly he got it correct the second time. What a horrible thing to do on live TV.

      I bet she pulled the legs off spiders and the legs and wings off Dragon flies when she was younger.

      Nasty woman. True Tory

    85. galamcennalath says:

      stewartb says:

      three lions …ways that English exceptionalism/superiority is expressed!

      Why is the UK coat of arms always have two sets of three lions in the shield’s quarters?

      The Scottish equivalent gets two sets of Lion Rampants, which is fair enough because it’s Scottish.

      The UK version appears to be actually an English one. Which is probably because, like so many other things, England/UK/Britain are seen as the same, and interchangeable.

    86. HandandShrimp says:

      The great thing about Murdo is that he is a ready made caricature. If he didn’t exist we would have to invent him.

    87. Meg merrilees says:

      Brian doonthetoon

      the biggest problem n the Ireland/N/Ireland UK Brexit situation is the DUP.

      Theresa May cannot afford to ignore their wishes and they vehemently want to Leave.

      The last General Election in N.Ireland saw Sinn Fein win all the seats along the border.

      N.ireland has no devolved government just now; Arlene is desperately trying to blame Sinn Fein for this in the hope that she can coerce T May into resuming Direct Rule.

      Forster has also been attacking Leo Varadker recently and there is a movement afoot to try and call for an election in Southern Ireland imminently. Any attempt to undermine the Irish government just now would be a blatant attempt to prevent Ireland from having any input from the North or South in the Brexit negotiations.

      It is patently obvious that the DUP tail is wagging the UK dog and T May must be bitterly regretting ever having done a deal with Arlene’s merry band of shape shifters .

      Galamcennalath’s statistics on N/Ireland make for interesting reading.

      I agree with you, I think there could be some fireworks off to the west in a very short time and I would go so far as to say that it could be the Ireland/N.Ireland situation that will preempt the break up of the Union, to Scottish Indy. A reunification of Ireland would be massive but there is no doubt that it would remain in the EU.

      It has been suggested that the simplest thing would be for England to Leave and let the rest of us get on with living – wish they would get on with it.

      Apparently sheep farmers in Australia are now getting worried about the effect Brexit could have on their trade with the EU.

    88. Meg merrilees says:

      error correction:

      …pre-empt the break up of the Union, NOT Scottish Indy.

    89. Lenny Hartley says:

      Heedtracker, today is not the anniversary of the tanks going into George square, it’s Jan 31st,
      I noticed this yesterday when a pro Indy fb group posted, so it’s obviously on the rounds.

    90. Brian Doonthetoon says:

      Because I am a great fan of “QI”, I know that the three lions are actually three heraldic leopards.

      From,
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Arms_of_England

      “Although in England the official blazon refers to “lions”, French heralds historically used the term “leopard” to represent the lion passant guardant, and hence the arms of England, no doubt, are more correctly blazoned, “leopards”.”

    91. Brian Doonthetoon says:

      So it begs the question – who will win the fight? Hamish or three leopards?

      I know who my bet’s on…

    92. ian murray says:

      No wonder Murdo does not like European culture.

      Norway and their 1 trillion dollars wealth fund have voted NO to executive pay rises of 4 companies that they are invested with.
      They have about 9,000 stocks bonds etc good for 1.5% of the total stock market, so when they speak companies better listen.
      That Oil fund looks like an even better idea than before.

    93. heedtracker says:

      Lenny Hartley says:
      26 November, 2017 at 11:02 pm
      Heedtracker, today is not the anniversary of the tanks going into George square, it’s Jan 31st,

      Got it! I was struck by the C4 dude explaining how Glasgow had spent the most in the UK, for what was an extraordinary new war machine, then turned on working class Glaswegians. The C4 guys didn’t mention that though, obvs.

      Ultimately, we have to look more carefully at this period, with revolution taking over Russia for example. Churchill would almost certainly have ordered the use of live fire on Glaswegians, if needed.

      You can still walk up to Maryhill to see what’s left of the barracks the Scottish troops were confined in too.

    94. Tackety Beets says:

      Graeme @ 9.40pm

      BDTT

      To explain , I have Been 100% for iScotland since the 60s.

      After casting my vote on Sept 18th 2014 , I walked down the hall & out the door with mixed feelings

      YES , happy with excitement, it could just be it about to happen in my lifetime BUT inside there was that little “niggle” almost like a wee voice saying “Feck , hope it’s the right thing”

      Why would I feel that after nearly 5 decades of wanting iScotland ?

      IMHO , simply the subconcience effect on listening as I did then to the MSM !

      I suggest we need to try not to be too hard on anyone who voted NO and are open minded to discuss.

      The converse to this to ignore the ignorant who still think the YooK is uber brilliant etc They are too blinkered.

      I engage occasionally with a few on FB ….. The spout JB all the time!

      Their latest is arranging a van to England-shire as a bottle o whiskey in Tesco will be £20 by next year …… Nippy’s idea o min price alcy!

    95. CameronB Brodie says:

      Re. the hidden symbolic reinforcements of cultural domination/subordination, that surround us and help to shape our self-conception. That sounds like semiotic mumbo jumbo to me, frankly. Have some of this. 😉

      Ideology, Hegemony, Discourse: A critical revIew of theories of Knowledge And Power

      For over a century, social theorists have attempted to explain why those who lack economic power consent to hierarchies of social and political power. They have used ideology, hegemony and discourse as key concepts to explain the intersections between the social production of knowledge and the perpetuation of power relations. The Marxist concept of ideology describes how the dominant ideas within a given society reflect the interests of a ruling economic class.

      In this paper, I trace the movement from this concept of ideology to models of hegemony and discourse. I then trace a second set of ruptures in theories of ideology, hegemony and discourse. Marx and others link ideology to a vision of society dominated by economic class as a field of social power. However, theorists of gender and “race” have questioned the place of class as the locus of power.

      I conclude by arguing that key theorists of gender and “race”— Hall, Smith, Hooks and Haraway — offer a more complex understanding of how our consent to networks of power is produced within contemporary capitalist societies. This argument has important implications for theory and practice directed at destabilizing our consent to power.

      https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/f66b/93d70a3ba41d23704c25d24f0e1a82935d0e.pdf

    96. Dave McEwan Hill says:

      I would verymuch like to see George Square in Glasgow become John Maclean Square or just Maclean Square

    97. Nana says:

      Brexit: aspirations
      http://www.eureferendum.com/blogview.aspx?blogno=86680

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/uk/peter-geoghegan/legatum-who-are-brexiteers-favourite-think-tank-and-who-is-behind-them

      EXCLUSIVE POLL: Unionist supporters content with East West post #Brexit border controls…
      http://archive.is/qBrpy

      Key European Agencies Move to Continent, Signs of Brexit’s Toll
      http://archive.is/s6cPP

    98. Ottomanboi says:

      @Dave McEwan Hill
      Square of the 31st January 1919……doesnt exactly roll off the tongue but gets people looking up the date and its bloody significance.

    99. Hamish100 says:

      The Ulster Unionists are content with their bribes and to hell with everyone else.

    100. Tinto Chiel says:

      Yon Butterfly Rebellion link re Yes EK is excellent, if depressing Nana. I see the Lefty poseurs are out in force again and hindering the independence movement.

      As was mentioned in the article, it takes a strange mind to think voting for Oooooooh Jeremy Corbyn! is going to deliver Scottish independence.

    101. Famous15 says:

      O/T BBC on GMS had a so called academic just spouting that police Scotland was put in place without the proper control and oversight structures. What happened to the Scottish police Authority? The neighborrs of BBC on Pacific Quay also are very powerful and that is HM Chief Inspectorate of Constabulary for Scotland. Back in the day they and their back up Civil Service examined and reexamined every expenditure ,all protocols AND every Senior appointment. They are all still in post. Perhaps we are now overreacting to the sensitivities of those who feel hurt or insult.

      We should examine whether a good public service has been damaged by demanding unobtainable standards.I feel angry that the real problems and concerns that every public service suffers from time to time may be overlooked.

    102. Capella says:

      Hi Nana, good links as ever. The Globalresearch article on who is masterminding BREXIT and profiting from the chaos is interesting. Carole Cadwalladr has not published on this recently. Looks as though the Guardian is restrained by legal challenges, like so many other investigators.

      https://www.globalresearch.ca/how-brexit-was-engineered-by-foreign-billionaires-to-bring-about-economic-chaos-for-profit/5614194

    103. galamcennalath says:

      From The Independent – “UK financial sector needs favourable Brexit banking deal after paying record amounts of tax, says City of London

      The financial services sector contributed record tax revenues of £72.1bn in the past year, prompting fresh calls for a separate Brexit deal for Britain’s banks “

      This smells of ‘cherry picking’ and ‘cake and eat it fantasies’ again!

      The only way to get a deal which is comprehensive enough to cover financial services is to stay in the single market.

      Otherwise, IMO, it seems highly unlikely there will be any deal for banks, one way or another.

      The spectrum of likely outcomes stretched from ‘no deal’ through to a Canada type deal. More complex ‘cherry picked’ arrangements are fantasy. A Canada type deal will cover goods trade, not services.

      Perhaps it goes wider, from an EU perspective. The UK has always been a bit of a financial buccaneer, laundering money and providing off shore tax havens. Why would the EU want to continue to facilitate this after Brexit?

      http://archive.is/tY1Bi (Text only)

    104. Petra says:

      Thanks for the links Nana.

      I see as we have people with a grand vision for achieving our objective of independence, ‘Yes2ScotRef-Campaign’ we have the usual abysmal culprits, ‘the-sin-of-yes-East Kilbride’ trying to undermine it once again. It’s no wonder we sometimes feel that we’re getting nowhere. Five steps forward … three steps back.

      Meanwhile arrogant Westminster with it’s sense of entitlement has just realised that it can no longer ride roughshod over Ireland in general. Penny dropped now? Seemed to forget that the Republic can veto them. The irony, eh? The very fact that Liam Fox (dark money / dark practices) and the DUP (dark money / dark practices) are in cahoots with each other should be sending a clear message to every decent-minded UK citizen that something stinks to high heaven and will end badly if not curbed.

      And as more and more people question where the money came from to back Brexit, from Russia, Saudi and the US to name but a few, it’s high time that someone took a closer look at the Electoral Commission. Won’t investigate, will investigate but won’t tell us anyway! Who’s calling the shots there?

      We should also be taking a closer look at Darren Grimes …. BeLeave. Wasn’t he a lucky boy? Who in Vote Leave chose him to receive around £700,000 of tax-payers money just before the EU referendum was held? And isn’t it just amazing that he managed to get a Canadian company, Aggregate IQ, to pump out their propaganda so effectively and in such a short time? It’s crucial, imo, that these issues should be clarified before our next referendum especially taking into account the vested interest the DUP, as one example, has in ensuring that we Scots will continue to be shackled to the Union: A Union that the sectarian bigots have great sway over now.

    105. Fred says:

      Thanks Nana, @ Dan Huil, good post! There is no UK version of the UK arms, it’s English or Scottish, take your pick! & having a harp stuck on either is an insult to the peeps in Ireland, there hasn’t been a king of Ireland for quite some time!

    106. Petra says:

      @ Famous 15 at 9:02am …. “Police Scotland.’

      There’s so many policemen now under investigation that you wonder what exactly is going on here?

      More and more Police moving in from South of the border. Policemen (and woman) wearing the Union Jack badge and to cap it all the blemish free Northern Irish Police Force involved in carrying out some of the investigations. Arlene must be loving it.

    107. SeanW92 says:

      Another tax payer funded wedding on the horizon, makes me physically sick.

      We will be enduring months of isn’t it great to be British wedding bonanza – BOKE! The tin foiled hat wearer in me suspects there is some planning that has gone into this, right when the establishment needs a distraction & when the butchers apron needs a bit of PR.

      Abolish the Monarchy & f**k the UK.

      Actually ragin’.

    108. orri says:

      Will need to re-listen at some point but could swear what Marr said was CSBC which would certainly have raise Davidson’s hackles.

    109. Petra says:

      Oh and some BREAKING news to distract us all from the Wonky Westminster Wasters and Botchup Brexit.

      To add to the many Royal Family celebrations and commiserations, over the last 70 years or so, constantly being shown on the TV right now they’ve just added a new one:

      Harry’s to Marry Meghan.

      That will be followed by Harry and Meghan’s freebie honeymoon, Harry and Meghan’s freebie palace, Harry and Megan’s weans, Harry and Megan’s freebie holidays, Meghan’s latest freebie £2 grand dress and maybe even another Royal scandal or ten.

      ……………………

      And some great news. Six Brits to be released from their Indian jail after four years. Scot, Billy Irving’s coming home.

    110. heedtracker says:

      Great links for coffee time Nana! How close we came to not having to call the DUP bigot loonies fellow countrymen and women too. Mind how we were threatened with losing our EU passports, unless we stayed under their giant union jack of lovelyness and joy?

      Beeb gimp network local, very excited over Come on Arlene:D

      EU referendum: Northern Ireland votes to Remain
      24 June 2016
      From the section Northern Ireland

      “In Northern Ireland, First Minister Arlene Foster said that as a leader of unionism, she felt it was the right decision.

      “We are now entering a new era of an even stronger United Kingdom,” she said.

      “We campaigned to leave the EU. This is the democratic decision of the people of the UK. This is a UK-wide decision and every vote is equal within the UK. I am proud of the fact that this decision was taken by the people.”

    111. Andy-B says:

      Belter Chris.

      Murdo, has more faces than the clock at Glasgow’s Royal Infirmary hospital.

    112. ronnie anderson says:

      @ Orri Im sure Marr said CBBC the wains programme lol .

    113. heedtracker says:

      It is of course, Come On Eileen! Maybe no longer being EU citizens wont be so bad, under UKOK planet toryboy rule, their bootboy beeb gimp network, DUP nutters…for the rest of our Scottish lives:-(

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVxcwe7EcaY

    114. Watching CNN this morning interview people in Northern and Southern Ireland they didn’t want a border.

      And they blamed the situation they find themselves in on English politics.

    115. Socrates MacSporran says:

      Oh Shite! between the Brexit negotiations, the ongoing quarrel over theIrish border and England losing the First cricket Test, I fear the UK is in deeper doo-dah than we thought.

      I base this view on the need to rush out Prince Harry’s engagement. There is no bigger squirrel than a Royal romance, marriage, death or divorce.

      We are all doomed, doomed Ah tell ye, if they have to play this deflectionary card at this time.

    116. geeo says:

      Clown over on facebook stating the SNP have wasted money, but failing to say where they have wasted it…!!

      A wee reminder about the wasted oil resources by WM.

      ……

      Here is another wee bit information on effects of no oil fund.

      If just 10 per cent of UK tax receipts from the North Sea had been put into an oil fund starting in 1980 and continuing until 2008, and if the nominal return had been 3 per cent, the value of the fund would have been £24bn per annum.

      Twenty per cent of oil revenues on a return of 5 per cent would have created a pot of £66bn per annum.

      The failure to create such a fund is brought home when you consider what it could have been spent on.

      To give one example, hundreds of thousands of new houses could be built to replace the housing stock Thatcher ran down through her iconic policy of selling council houses. We might not face the housing shortage crisis we do today.

      Or major infrastructure projects with no loans meaning no repayments and no crippling interest payments.
      ……….

      Imagine if Scotland were independent, and if the McCrone report was not covered up by successive WM governments, we surely would be long before now, what £24 – £66bn PER YEAR could do for Scotland…!!

      £24 bn is nearly DOUBLE our entire Scottish NHS budget.

      Or 16 Queensferry crossings (with £700 million change).

      Imagine the transformational effect on not only Scottish infrastructure, but the positive impact on education, health, the economy etc…

      And to fund ALL these things without borrowing a single penny.

      The conservative estimate of 3% return (£24bn) would have transformed Scotland.

      Yet, this CAN STILL HAPPEN.

      All we have to do is vote Yes in the next indyref, and within a single generation, Scotland would be an incredibly wealthy country with our long term future sorted for all our residents.

      There is at least 50 years of oil and gas reserves (Hammond quoted 21 BILLION barrels left) to extract, and that DOES NOT include the potential of the West coast basin, known to be oil and gas rich, but not accessable due to Trident.

      A properly taxed/regulated oil and gas sector would make Scotland INCREDIBLY wealthy, and if anyone says otherwise, they ABSOLUTELY ARE LYING to you.

      Norway had LESS oil and Gas than we did, they invested it into an oil fund, and look at them now.

      £1,000,000,000,000 (£1 TRILLION) oil fund, which actually now yields MORE MONEY per annum, than Norway earns from taxation from the sector !!!

      That COULD AND SHOULD have been Scotland, in or out the uk.

      One thing is certain, under WM control, EVERY PENNY of oil and gas revenue WILL be squandered.

      ONLY independence can create wealth for Scotland, and the social and economic benefits which come with it.

      If you are still not Yes, why on earth not ???
      …………

      As ever, no response..wonder why ?

    117. galamcennalath says:

      ” If, as seems increasingly likely, the European Union summit on 15 December does not give the go-ahead for talks on a post-Brexit trade deal, we already know who’s going to get the blame.

      It will be all Ireland’s fault. “

      http://archive.is/LF9L8

    118. Gary45% says:

      Socrates@11.12.
      Spot on, Looks like the Brenda & Phil show is going to last a while yet.
      Through the history of this sorry excuse of an Empire, State funeral or State wedding to keep the gullible masses underfoot.
      Expect to see the “Action Harry and the “Princess” action figures out in time for the “special day??”
      At least there are plenty uniforms out there for wee Harry.

    119. starlaw says:

      In the Westminster great scheme of things, the UK would withdraw from EU. following which the EU would collapse leaving Ireland stranded. Ireland would see sense and accept the authority of the crown and rejoin the UK leaving no need for an Irish border.
      This was the great plan from day one and could still work if the Irish are as stupid as Westminster believes them to be.

      Sadly for Westminster none of this is likely to happen, perhaps the border issue could be decided by the people of NI.

    120. Legerwood says:

      It would appear from reports in the Herald today that Mr Leonard’s approach to inspiring Labour in Scotland to new heights (of inadequacy?) Will include setting up various commissions and reviews to chart the way forward.

      I seem to remember past Labourleaders in Scotland doing the same thing to little effect. Maybe he thinks doing even more commissions and reviews will get a result.

      What was it Einstein said about doing the same thing over and over again…?

    121. ronnie anderson says:

      The royal wedding is more like ah trade agreement noo we hiv ah mair special relationship wie America . Mug manufacturers will be in overdrive producing MUGS for MUGS ( whits ah gathering of Squirrels cawed again ) .

    122. Dr Jim says:

      Right on time the Holy Royal Empire rides to the rescue of R Precious Union once again filling the news with the distracting crap they usually fill it with when crisis looms saving the Nation from actual news and the state broadcasters from finding new ways of avoiding reporting it

      Prince Harry better hope the four in front of him for the throne stay safe and alive or his girlfriend’s toast just like his Mum and her boyfriend

      Times don’t change in the Royal family firm, they have much form for removing folk who don’t fit in
      Watch yer back Meghan and don’t be fooled by the smiles

      Save yourself

    123. ronnie anderson says:

      That royal wedding announcement has given me ah bit of ah dilemma I dont know whither tae watch it on bbc ( licence free ) or hingoot the bunting aw fekit any you’s wumming goat any auld issues of the Bunty ah kin read tae occupy my time for that week lol.

    124. HandandShrimp says:

      Switched on radio shortbread at 7.30 to catch the weather and immediately after there was a piece about Police Scotland with Kenny MacAskill saying it was right for politicians to stay out and let the SPA deal with any wrongdoing if any is determined.

      Some other chap was also on and immediately went into some guff about it being the Government’s fault because they unified the forces and the old forces were organic bread or some similar load of shite (there was nothing organic about the Strathclyde police force).

      However, charges of bullying against the Chief may be connected to the fact there appears to be issues with some other senior officers. A new broom has tried to sweep clean and met resistance? Just a thought. However, this has little to do with whether there is one force or 8. I couldn’t be bothered listening and switched off the radio. I never feel enlightened when I listen to the BBC any more. It is like ploughing through 3 day old porridge and about as appetising.

    125. CameronB Brodie says:

      Re. the housing crisis and right-to-buy. IMHO, it is an unsustainable policy that goes against the principle of international development law, in that is reduces the ability of many to meet their basic human needs.

      The Right to Buy: History and Prospect

      Executive Summary

      Following its election in 2015, the Conservative government has announced proposals to extend the Right to Buy (RTB) to housing association tenants.

      The new proposals are to sell high value council housing to finance replacement dwellings.

      As with the Right to Buy in previous years better off tenants living in more desirable properties and places are most likely to gain.

      Proposals were greeted with alarm by housing associations, but under a subsequent agreement housing associations have agreed to a voluntary Right to Buy scheme still financed by high value council properties.

      Proposals to extend the Right to Buy revive questions debated earlier in the history of public housing, over the loss of relets, the long term costs of dismantling the public and social rented sector, the expansion of private renting and the costs associated with this and the effect in increasing housing stress and segregation.

      The extraordinary levels of discount associated with the Right to Buy are brought into increased focus because public funds will be required to finance their extension to housing associations.

      http://www.historyandpolicy.org/policy-papers/papers/the-right-to-buy-history-and-prospect#

    126. geeo says:

      @ronnie.

      No sure about it helping trade with Trump…Markle is an outspoken Trump critic.

      Although, she will obviously be told that better change pronto.

    127. CameronB Brodie says:

      HandandShrimp
      That got my spidey senses tingling. Was any indication given of this other chap’s political affiliation?

      Conservatism

      1.3 Tradition and gradual reform: conservatism vs. reaction

      As we have seen, it is generally recognised that conservatism is not dogmatic reaction. It advocates piecemeal, moderate reform, which follows from its scepticism concerning reason, and its valuing of experience concerning human affairs. Burke argued that “a state without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation”. But change must be cautious, because knowledge is imperfect and consequences can be unintended. According to conservatives, institutions and morals evolve, their weaknesses become apparent and obvious political abuses are corrected; but ancient institutions embody a tacit wisdom that deserves respect. Conservatives are sceptical of large-scale constitutional, economic or cultural planning, because behaviour and institutions have evolved through the wisdom of generations, which cannot easily be articulated.

      The notion of tradition is central to conservatism, and its self-conscious, contrastive use arises only in modernity. In the later 18th century, the mobilisation of “the past” as an explicit political resource became especially important, and a contrast between “traditional” and “modern”—as opposed to “ancient” and “modern”—was stressed. Burke’s political philosophy was an early instance of this process. This mobilisation has been associated with “the invention of tradition” (Hobsbawm and Ranger 1983), in which mass-produced “traditional” artefacts established a fictional organic relation between past and present, as in Sir Walter Scott’s re-invention of the kilt and other “traditional” artefacts for King George IV’s visit to Edinburgh in 1822.

      For conservatives, vital political relations are organic. Unlike reactionary thinkers, they regard traditions not as static, but as in a gentle and gradual flux, encouraged by the astute reformer. For Burke, the English revolutionaries of 1688 achieved restoration as opposed to “innovation”. Reform corrects the inadequacies of ancient institutions in light of contemporary needs—conservatives such as Disraeli might want to create a broader suffrage, for instance—but one must disdain “the blind and furious spirit of innovation”. Reform must be practically and not theoretically-based:

      I must see with my own eyes…touch with my own hands not only the fixed but the momentary circumstances, before I could venture to suggest any political project whatsoever…I must see the means of correcting the plan…I must see the things; I must see the men. (Burke, WS III: 326)

      For Kekes, conservatism adopts a stance of scepticism between extremes of rationalism and fideism (belief based on faith), and steers a middle course of pessimism between claims of perfectibility and corruptibility (1998: 54, 89, 60). Conservatives aim to

      conserve the political arrangements that have historically shown themselves to be conducive to good lives thus understood (1998: 27);

      they regard

      history [as] the best guide to understanding the present and planning for the future. (Kekes 1997: 352)

      Conservatism’s “organic” social vision is inherently sceptical of the state, and puts faith instead in the family, private property and religion; it does not involve the rich organicism of the British Idealists Bradley and Bosanquet, that yields “a mystical union with the superior unity of the state”—a German philosophical rather than British conservative conception (Sweet 1999). As Cobban writes, Locke’s influence ensured that the “historic idea in Burke’s mind [did not] pass into the full organic theory of society” (Cobban 1960: 89). It is reaction and not conservatism that is inherently authoritarian. For conservatives, individuals and local communities are better assessors of their own needs and problems than distant bureaucrats. Free from utopian planning, conservatives hold, society finds its own, largely beneficial, shape.

      Conservatism proceeds via the tried and tested, relying not on pure reason, but on what Burke called the “latent wisdom” of prejudice, instinct and custom, which accumulates across generations. For Kirk, “prejudice is not bigotry or superstition”, though it may degenerate into these; it is

      pre-judgment, the answer…which intuition and ancestral consensus of opinion supply…when [one] lacks either time or knowledge to arrive at a decision predicated upon pure reason. (1954: 34)

      For conservatives, custom is immemorial but not thereby static; it is “constantly being subjected to the test of experience” (Pocock 1989: 213). But to change the state in response to “floating fancies or fashions” is to break the “whole chain and continuity of the commonwealth” (Burke, WS III: 145).

      https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/conservatism/

    128. Lenny Hartley says:

      Thoughtful of Prince Harry to announce his engagement during the Black Friday sales period. Saved me £35 on his engagement present. A DNA testing kit.
      Does anybody know if his dad is still in the Army?

    129. Dan Huil says:

      Bread and Circuses, like Divide and Rule, is an old establishment trick to fool the gullible and keep the establishment in charge.

      Today we have Harry and his new girlfriend. The British nationalist establishment must be hoping their engagement will, once again, fool the gullible and take their mind off the disaster that is brexit. It might work in England and britnat bits of the north of Ireland but it won’t fool the rest of Ireland and it won’t fool Scotland.

      I wonder if harry will be wearing his Nazi armband during the wedding ceremony?

    130. CameronB Brodie says:

      Though an organic view of society might appear attractive, it does not deal well with the march-of-time or real-world events, such as technological progress and changing social values.

      Conservatism

      Conservatism does not ask ultimate questions and hence does not give final answers. But it does remind men of
      the institutional prerequisites of social order.
      (Huntington 1957: 473)

      Conservatism and change

      Whether conservatism is understood as the ideological
      articulation of a reactionary tendency to defend establishment and social privilege or merely a prudent manifestation of risk aversion and scepticism towards grand schemes for improving society, it has coalesced into a body of thought inseparable from the question of how to manage change. As emphasised in a recent study by O’Hara (2011), conservatives do not simply reject and resist all forms of change in social, political and economic arrangements of any given society. Instead they accept that change is inevitable and have articulated a distinct approach to identifying and understanding circumstances in which change might contribute to resolving contradictions and discord inexisting arrangements. In doing so, conservatives aim to aid in the preservation of institutions and practices, rather than rendering them unviable and thus tearing them asunderby rejecting any changeat all. As O’Sullivan (1976: 9) puts it in his introduction to the ‘philosophy of imperfection’:

      [c]onservatism as an ideology, then, is characterized in the first instance, by opposition to the idea of total or radical change, and not by the absurd idea of opposition to change as such, or by any commitment to preserving all existing institutions.

      Willingness on the part of conservatives to accept change where necessary must however be distinguished from accepting any change, or generously promoting it. Neither the radical reactionary nor progressive mind-sets capture
      the conservatives’ outlook on social change. In making any decisions to alter, for instance, the basis for a monarch’s authority, the scope of participation by citizens in parliamentary affairs or the extent to which private property can be taxed to provide public goods, a careful balance must be struck between a need to adjust disequilibrium in existing social arrangements and the importance of not overestimating the degree to which the status quo might be improved upon, as opposed to create worse problems than the ones already at hand: from the French to the Russian and Chinese revolutions, history provides ample evidence of radical change to existing social arrangements producing evils in some in stances far surpassing those they succeeded.

      From this point of view, conservatism is not a mere negative reaction to social change, brought on in the modern era by the ideational and socio-economic transformations of, respectively, Enlightenment and industrial revolution. Burke, for instance, supported the claims of American colonists against King George III and argued for the easing of the Penal Laws against Catholics in Ireland partly for the purpose of maintaining the British Empire. By compromise and accepting the necessity of some significant change to existing arrangements, he aimed to protect an established order against further disruption (O’Brien
      1992).

      On this view, conservatism constitutes a positive engagement with change to mitigate its destructive potential and to preserve established ways of societies as they actually exist and wherein, in Burke’s words, the living bear responsibilities not only to their own generation, and not merely contractual ones, but to those of generations past and those still to come. In this emphasis on obligations transcending the individuals immediately involved in societal interactions we can perceive an early divergence within the otherwise intertwined origins of conservatism and liberalism in Britain: key conservative concepts such as social discipline, deference and corporate solidarity were ones that, according to Wolin (2001: 55), ‘liberal thinkers beginning with Hobbes and Locke and continuing in the English Utilitarians were unable to generate from liberal assumptions about free, equal and consciously consenting individuals’. The idea, then, is to conserve to the extent possible, but not absolutely….

      https://pure.qub.ac.uk/portal/files/17525826/Andreasson_2014_Conservatism_in_Political_Ideologies_4th_ed.pdf

      Edmund Burke: The Organic Theory of Society

      ….You will observe, that from Magna Charta to the Declaration of Right, it has been the uniform policy of our constitution to claim and assert our liberties, as an entailed inheritance derived to us from our forefathers, and to be transmitted to our posterity; as an estate specially belonging to the people of this kingdom without any reference whatever to any other more general or prior right. By this means our constitution preserves a unity in so great a diversity of its parts. We have an inheritable crown; an inheritable peerage; and a House of Commons and a people inheriting privileges, franchises, and liberties, from a long line of ancestors.

      This policy appears to me to be the result of profound reflection; or rather the happy effect of following nature, which is wisdom without reflection, and above it. A spirit of innovation is generally the results of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to posterity, who never look backward to their ancestors. Besides, the people of England well know, that the idea of inheritance furnishes a sure principle of conservatism, and a sure principle of transmission; without at all excluding a principle of improvement. It leaves acquisition free; but it secures what it acquires. Whatever advantages are obtained by a state proceeding on these maxims, are locked fast as in a sort of family settlement; grasped as in a kind of mortmain for ever. By a constitutional policy, working after the pattern of nature, we receive, we hold, we transmit our government and our privileges, in the same manner in which we enjoy and transmit our property and our lives.

      The institutions of policy, the goods of fortune, the gifts of Providence, are handed down, to use and from us, in the same course and order. Our political system is placed in a just correspondence and symmetry with the order of the world, and with the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts; wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, moulding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race, the whole, at one time, is never old, or middle-aged, or young, but in a condition of unchangeable constancy, moves on through the varied tenour of perpetual decay, fall renovation, and progression. Thus, by preserving the method of nature in the conduct of the state, in what we improve we are never wholly new, in what we retain we are never wholly obsolete. By adhering in this manner and one those principles to our forefathers, we are guided not by the superstition of antiquarians, but by the spirit of philosophic analogy.

      In this choice of inheritance we have given to our frame of polity the image of a relation in blood; binding up the constitution of our country with our dearest domestic ties; adopting our fundamental laws into the bosom of our family affections; keeping inseparable, and cherishing with the warmth of all their combined and mutually reflected charities, our state, our hearths, our sepulchres, and our altars. Through the same plan of a conformity to nature in our artificial institutions, and by calling in the aid of her unerring and powerful instincts, to fortify the fallible and feeble contrivances of our reason, we have derived several other, and those no small benefits, from considering our liberties in the light of an inheritance. Always acting as if in the presence of canonized forefathers, the spirit of freedom, leading in itself to misrule and excess, is termed with an awful gravity. This idea of a liberal descent inspires us with a sense of habitual native dignity, which prevents that upstart insolence almost inevitably adhering to and disgracing those who are the first acquirers of any distinction. By this means our liberty becomes a noble freedom. It carries an imposing and majestic aspect. It has a pedigree and illustrating ancestors….

      http://traditionalbritain.org/blog/edmund-burke-organic-theory-society/

      UKCP set out their vision at the Conservative Party Conference

      UKCP Vice Chair Patricia Hunt opened the debate by declaring psychotherapists as the new and vital social innovators working from the grassroots, citing the recent report by UN Special Rapporteur Dainius P?ras calling on Governments to shift from a biomedical model in favour of cultivating ‘rights-based societies’….

      https://www.psychotherapy.org.uk/news/ukcp-set-vision-conservative-party-conference/

    131. CameronB Brodie says:

      Though an organic view of society might appear attractive, it does not deal well with the march-of-time or real-world events, such as technological progress and changing social values.

      Conservatism

      Conservatism does not ask ultimate questions and hence does not give final answers. But it does remind men of
      the institutional prerequisites of social order.
      (Huntington 1957: 473)

      Conservatism and change

      Whether conservatism is understood as the ideological
      articulation of a reactionary tendency to defend establishment and social privilege or merely a prudent manifestation of risk aversion and scepticism towards grand schemes for improving society, it has coalesced into a body of thought inseparable from the question of how to manage change. As emphasised in a recent study by O’Hara (2011), conservatives do not simply reject and resist all forms of change in social, political and economic arrangements of any given society. Instead they accept that change is inevitable and have articulated a distinct approach to identifying and understanding circumstances in which change might contribute to resolving contradictions and discord inexisting arrangements. In doing so, conservatives aim to aid in the preservation of institutions and practices, rather than rendering them unviable and thus tearing them asunderby rejecting any changeat all. As O’Sullivan (1976: 9) puts it in his introduction to the ‘philosophy of imperfection’:

      [c]onservatism as an ideology, then, is characterized in the first instance, by opposition to the idea of total or radical change, and not by the absurd idea of opposition to change as such, or by any commitment to preserving all existing institutions.

      Willingness on the part of conservatives to accept change where necessary must however be distinguished from accepting any change, or generously promoting it. Neither the radical reactionary nor progressive mind-sets capture
      the conservatives’ outlook on social change. In making any decisions to alter, for instance, the basis for a monarch’s authority, the scope of participation by citizens in parliamentary affairs or the extent to which private property can be taxed to provide public goods, a careful balance must be struck between a need to adjust disequilibrium in existing social arrangements and the importance of not overestimating the degree to which the status quo might be improved upon, as opposed to create worse problems than the ones already at hand: from the French to the Russian and Chinese revolutions, history provides ample evidence of radical change to existing social arrangements producing evils in some in stances far surpassing those they succeeded.

      From this point of view, conservatism is not a mere negative reaction to social change, brought on in the modern era by the ideational and socio-economic transformations of, respectively, Enlightenment and industrial revolution. Burke, for instance, supported the claims of American colonists against King George III and argued for the easing of the Penal Laws against Catholics in Ireland partly for the purpose of maintaining the British Empire. By compromise and accepting the necessity of some significant change to existing arrangements, he aimed to protect an established order against further disruption (O’Brien
      1992).

      On this view, conservatism constitutes a positive engagement with change to mitigate its destructive potential and to preserve established ways of societies as they actually exist and wherein, in Burke’s words, the living bear responsibilities not only to their own generation, and not merely contractual ones, but to those of generations past and those still to come. In this emphasis on obligations transcending the individuals immediately involved in societal interactions we can perceive an early divergence within the otherwise intertwined origins of conservatism and liberalism in Britain: key conservative concepts such as social discipline, deference and corporate solidarity were ones that, according to Wolin (2001: 55), ‘liberal thinkers beginning with Hobbes and Locke and continuing in the English Utilitarians were unable to generate from liberal assumptions about free, equal and consciously consenting individuals’. The idea, then, is to conserve to the extent possible, but not absolutely….

      https://pure.qub.ac.uk/portal/files/17525826/Andreasson_2014_Conservatism_in_Political_Ideologies_4th_ed.pdf

      Edmund Burke: The Organic Theory of Society

      ….You will observe, that from Magna Charta to the Declaration of Right, it has been the uniform policy of our constitution to claim and assert our liberties, as an entailed inheritance derived to us from our forefathers, and to be transmitted to our posterity; as an estate specially belonging to the people of this kingdom without any reference whatever to any other more general or prior right. By this means our constitution preserves a unity in so great a diversity of its parts. We have an inheritable crown; an inheritable peerage; and a House of Commons and a people inheriting privileges, franchises, and liberties, from a long line of ancestors.

      This policy appears to me to be the result of profound reflection; or rather the happy effect of following nature, which is wisdom without reflection, and above it. A spirit of innovation is generally the results of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to posterity, who never look backward to their ancestors. Besides, the people of England well know, that the idea of inheritance furnishes a sure principle of conservatism, and a sure principle of transmission; without at all excluding a principle of improvement. It leaves acquisition free; but it secures what it acquires. Whatever advantages are obtained by a state proceeding on these maxims, are locked fast as in a sort of family settlement; grasped as in a kind of mortmain for ever. By a constitutional policy, working after the pattern of nature, we receive, we hold, we transmit our government and our privileges, in the same manner in which we enjoy and transmit our property and our lives.

      The institutions of policy, the goods of fortune, the gifts of Providence, are handed down, to use and from us, in the same course and order. Our political system is placed in a just correspondence and symmetry with the order of the world, and with the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts; wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, moulding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race, the whole, at one time, is never old, or middle-aged, or young, but in a condition of unchangeable constancy, moves on through the varied tenour of perpetual decay, fall renovation, and progression. Thus, by preserving the method of nature in the conduct of the state, in what we improve we are never wholly new, in what we retain we are never wholly obsolete. By adhering in this manner and one those principles to our forefathers, we are guided not by the superstition of antiquarians, but by the spirit of philosophic analogy.

      In this choice of inheritance we have given to our frame of polity the image of a relation in blood; binding up the constitution of our country with our dearest domestic ties; adopting our fundamental laws into the bosom of our family affections; keeping inseparable, and cherishing with the warmth of all their combined and mutually reflected charities, our state, our hearths, our sepulchres, and our altars. Through the same plan of a conformity to nature in our artificial institutions, and by calling in the aid of her unerring and powerful instincts, to fortify the fallible and feeble contrivances of our reason, we have derived several other, and those no small benefits, from considering our liberties in the light of an inheritance. Always acting as if in the presence of canonized forefathers, the spirit of freedom, leading in itself to misrule and excess, is termed with an awful gravity. This idea of a liberal descent inspires us with a sense of habitual native dignity, which prevents that upstart insolence almost inevitably adhering to and disgracing those who are the first acquirers of any distinction. By this means our liberty becomes a noble freedom. It carries an imposing and majestic aspect. It has a pedigree and illustrating ancestors….

      http://traditionalbritain.org/blog/edmund-burke-organic-theory-society/

      UKCP set out their vision at the Conservative Party Conference

      UKCP Vice Chair Patricia Hunt opened the debate by declaring psychotherapists as the new and vital social innovators working from the grassroots, citing the recent report by UN Special Rapporteur Dainius P?ras calling on Governments to shift from a biomedical model in favour of cultivating ‘rights-based societies’….

      https://www.psychotherapy.org.uk/news/ukcp-set-vision-conservative-party-conference/

    132. CameronB Brodie says:

      Oops, sorry.

    133. F.Meek says:

      For the lot Cameron?

    134. CameronB Brodie says:

      F.Meek
      Nah, the double post mate. Political history and philosophy is important but I’m not trying to give folk the boak. 😉

    135. CameronB Brodie says:

      Here’s one for folk who don’t click through. An academic insight into “common sense”/”populist reactionary” politics.

      Peter King’s recorded talk – ‘Disdain of the Past’ – at the ‘Another Country – is there a future for Tradition?’ Conference – organised by the Traditional Britain Group and the Quarterly Review (2012).
      http://traditionalbritain.org/blog/peter-king-reactionary-politics-and-what-they-can-or-cant-teach-us-about-future-conference/



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